Самоучебник по английскому

Меню

The Emperor's new clothes

Many years ago, there was an Emperor who was so very fond of new clothes that he spent all his money on them.

He did not trouble about his soldiers. He did not care to go to the theatre. He only went out when he had the chance to show off his new clothes. He had a different suit for each hour of the day.

Most kings could be found sitting in council. It was said of the Emperor, "He is sitting in his wardrobe."

One day, two fellows calling themselves weavers came to town. They said that they knew how to weave cloth of the most beautiful colors and patterns.

The clothes made from this wonderful cloth would be invisible to everyone who was unfit for the job he held, or who was very simple in character.

"These must, indeed, be splendid clothes!" thought the Emperor. "If I had such a suit, I might at once find out what men in my kingdom are unfit for their job. I would be able to tell the wise men from the foolish! This stuff must be woven for me immediately."

He gave large sums of money to both the weavers in order that they might begin their work at once.

So the two pretend weavers set up two looms. They worked very busily, though in reality they did nothing at all. They asked for the finest silk and the purest gold thread. They put both into their own knapsacks. Then they pretended to work at the empty looms until late at night.

"I should like to know how the weavers are getting on with my cloth," said the Emperor to himself one day.

When he remembered that a simpleton, or one unfit for his job would be unable to see the cloth he began to worry. To be sure, he thought he was safe. However, he would prefer sending somebody else to bring him news about the weavers, and their work.

All the people in the kingdom had heard of the wonderful cloth. All were eager to learn how wise or how foolish their neighbors might be.

"I will send my faithful old wise man to the weavers," said the Emperor at last. "He will be best able to see how the cloth looks. He is a man of sense. No one can be better for his job than he is."

So the faithful old wise man went into the hall where the thieves were working with all their might at their empty looms.

"What can be the meaning of this?" thought the old man, opening his eyes very wide. "I cannot find the least bit of thread on the looms." However, he did not say his thoughts aloud.

The thieves asked him very kindly to be so good as to come nearer their looms. Then, they asked him whether the cloth pleased him. They asked whether the colors were not very beautiful. All the time they were pointing to the empty frames.

The poor old wise man looked and looked. He could not see anything on the looms for a very good reason. There was nothing there.

"What!" thought he again. "Is it possible that I am a fool? I have never thought so myself. No one must know it now if I am so. Can it be, that I am unfit for my job? No, the Emperor must not know that either. I will never tell that I could not see the stuff."

"Well, Sir!" said one of the weavers still pretending to work. "You do not say whether the cloth pleases you."

"Oh, it is excellent!" replied the old wise man, looking at the loom through his spectacles. "This pattern, and the colors. Yes, I will tell the Emperor without delay, how very beautiful I think them."

"We shall be much obliged to you," said the thieves.

Then they named the many colors and described the pattern of the pretended stuff. The old wise man listened with care to their words so he might repeat them to the Emperor.

The thieves asked for more silk and gold saying that it was necessary to complete what they had begun.

Once again they put all that was given them into their knapsacks. They went on working with as much effort as before at their empty looms.

The Emperor soon sent another man from his court to see how the weavers were getting on.

Now he wanted to know if the cloth would soon be ready. It was just the same with this gentleman as with the wise man.

First he looked closely at the looms on all sides. He could see nothing at all but the empty frames.

"Does not the stuff appear as beautiful to you, as it did to my lord the wise man?" asked the thieves of the Emperor’s second advisor.

"I certainly am not stupid!" thought the man. "It must be, that I am not fit for my good job! That is very odd. However, no one shall know anything about it."

And so he praised the stuff he could not see. He declared that he was happy with both colors and patterns.

"Indeed, your Imperial Majesty," he said to his emperor when he returned. "The cloth which the weavers are preparing is extraordinarily magnificent."

The whole city was talking of the splendid cloth, which the Emperor had ordered to be woven.

Finally, the Emperor himself wished to see the costly material while it was still in the loom.

He took many officers of the court and the two honest men who had already admired the cloth.

As soon as the weavers saw the Emperor approach, they went on working faster than ever although they still did not pass even one thread through the looms.

"Is not the work absolutely magnificent?" said the two officers of the crown, already mentioned.

"If your Majesty will only be pleased to look at it! What a splendid design! What glorious colors!" and at the same time they pointed to the empty frames; for they imagined that everyone else could see this exquisite piece of workmanship.

"How is this?" said the Emperor to himself. "I can see nothing! This is indeed a terrible affair! Am I a simpleton, or am I unfit to be an Emperor? That would be the worst thing that could happen!"

"Oh, the cloth is charming," said he, aloud. "I approve of it completely."

He smiled most graciously and looked closely at the empty looms. No way would he say that he could not see what two of his advisors had praised so much.

Everyone with the Emperor now strained his or her eyes hoping to discover something on the looms, but they could see no more than the others.

Nevertheless, they all exclaimed, "Oh, how beautiful!" and advised his majesty to have some new clothes made from this splendid material for the parade that was planned.

"Magnificent! Charming! Excellent!" was called out on all sides.

Everyone was very cheerful. The Emperor was pleased. He presented the weavers with the emblem of an order of knighthood.

The thieves sat up the whole of the night before the day on which the parade was to take place. They had sixteen lights burning so that everyone might see how anxious they were to finish the Emperor’s new suit. They pretended to roll the cloth off the looms.

They cut the air with their scissors and sewed with needles without any thread in them. "See!" cried they, at last. "The Emperor’s new clothes are ready!"

The Emperor, with all the grandees of his court, came to the weavers. The thieves raised their arms, as if in the act of holding something up.

"Here are your Majesty’s trousers! Here is the scarf! Here is the mantle! The whole suit is as light as a cobweb; one might fancy one has nothing at all on, when dressed in it."

"Yes indeed!" said all the courtiers, although not one of them could see anything of this special cloth.

The Emperor was undressed for a fitting, and the thieves pretended to array him in his new suit. The Emperor turned round and from side to side before the looking glass.

"How splendid his Majesty looks in his new clothes, and how well they fit!" everyone cried out. "What a design! What colors! These are indeed royal robes!"

"I am quite ready," said the Emperor. He appeared to be examining his handsome suit.

The lords of the bedchamber, who were to carry his Majesty’s train felt about on the ground as if they were lifting up the ends of the mantle. Then they pretended to be carrying something for they would by no means want to appear foolish or not fit for their jobs.

The Emperor walked under his high canopy in the midst of the procession, through the streets of his capital.

All the people standing by, and those at the windows, cried out, "Oh! How beautiful are our Emperor’s new clothes! What a magnificent train there is to the mantle; and how gracefully the scarf hangs!"

No one would admit these much admired clothes could not be seen because, in doing so, he would have been saying he was either a simpleton or unfit for his job.

"But the Emperor has nothing at all on!" said a little child. "Listen to the voice of the child!" exclaimed his father.

What the child had said was whispered from one to another.

"But he has nothing at all on!" at last cried out all the people.

The Emperor was upset, for he knew that the people were right. However, he thought the procession must go on now!

The lords of the bedchamber took greater pains than ever, to appear holding up a train, although, in reality, there was no train to hold, and the Emperor walked on in his underwear.

The End

Таблица для изучения текста.

Many years ago, there was an Emperor who was so very fond of new clothes that he spent all his money on them.Много лет назад жил-был Император, который так любил новую одежду, что тратил на нее все свои деньги.Emperor - [ˈempərə] - император государь царь
fond - [fɒnd] - любящий
He did not trouble about his soldiers.Он не беспокоился о своих солдатах.trouble - [trʌbl] - беспокоить тревожить
He did not care to go to the theatre.Ему не хотелось идти в театр.
He only went out when he had the chance to show off his new clothes.Он выходил на улицу только тогда, когда у него была возможность похвастаться своей новой одеждой.
He had a different suit for each hour of the day.На каждый час дня у него был свой костюм.suit - [sjuːt] - костюм одежда
Most kings could be found sitting in council.Большинство королей можно было найти сидящими в совете.council - [ˈkaʊns(ə)l] - совет
It was said of the Emperor, "He is sitting in his wardrobe."Об императоре было сказано: "Он сидит в своем шкафу".
One day, two fellows calling themselves weavers came to town.Однажды в город приехали двое парней, называвших себя ткачами.fellow - [ˈfeləʊ] - товарищ
weaver - [ˈwiːvə] - ткач
They said that they knew how to weave cloth of the most beautiful colors and patterns.Они сказали, что знают, как ткать ткань самых красивых цветов и узоров.weave - [wiːv] - ткать
cloth - [klɒθ] - ткань
patterns - [pætnz] - узоры
The clothes made from this wonderful cloth would be invisible to everyone who was unfit for the job he held, or who was very simple in character.Одежда, сшитая из этой замечательной ткани, была бы невидима для всех, кто не годился для той работы, которую он выполнял, или у кого был очень простой характер (кто не на своём месте сидит или глупец).unfit - [ʌnˈfɪt] - непригодный неподходящий
hold - [həʊld] - держать иметь владеть
"These must, indeed, be splendid clothes!" thought the Emperor."Это, должно быть, действительно великолепная одежда!" - подумал император.indeed - [ɪnˈdiːd] - действительно
"If I had such a suit, I might at once find out what men in my kingdom are unfit for their job."Если бы у меня был такой костюм, я мог бы сразу выяснить, какие люди в моем королевстве непригодны для своей работы.
I would be able to tell the wise men from the foolish!Я смог бы делать мудрецов посмешищем!foolish - [ˈfuːlɪʃ] - глупый
This stuff must be woven for me immediately."Это материя должна быть соткана для меня немедленно".stuff - [stʌf] - материал
immediately - [ɪˈmiːdɪətlɪ] - немедленно
He gave large sums of money to both the weavers in order that they might begin their work at once.Он дал большие суммы денег обоим ткачам, чтобы они могли сразу приступить к своей работе.order - [ˈɔːdə] - заказ приказ порядок
So the two pretend weavers set up two looms.Итак, двое притворяющихся ткачей установили два ткацких станка.loom - [luːm] - ткацкий станок
They worked very busily, though in reality they did nothing at all.Они работали очень усердно, хотя на самом деле вообще ничего не делали.though - [ðəʊ] - хотя
They asked for the finest silk and the purest gold thread.Они просили самый прекрасный шелк и нить из чистейшего золота.purest - [pjʊərest] - чистейший
They put both into their own knapsacks.Они положили и то, и другое в свои рюкзаки.knapsack - [ˈnæpsæk] - рюкзак
Then they pretended to work at the empty looms until late at night.Затем они притворялись, что работают на пустых станках до поздней ночи.
"I should like to know how the weavers are getting on with my cloth," said the Emperor to himself one day."Я хотел бы знать, как ткачи справляются с моей тканью", - сказал себе однажды император.
When he remembered that a simpleton, or one unfit for his job would be unable to see the cloth he began to worry.Когда он вспомнил, что простак или человек, непригодный для его работы, не сможет увидеть ткань, он начал беспокоиться.simpleton - [ˈsɪmp(ə)lt(ə)n] - простак простофиля дурачок
To be sure, he thought he was safe.Но он был уверен, что за себя-то ему нечего переживать.
However, he would prefer sending somebody else to bring him news about the weavers, and their work.Однако он предпочел бы послать кого-нибудь другого, чтобы сообщить ему новости о ткачах и их работе.However - [haʊˈevə] - Однако
All the people in the kingdom had heard of the wonderful cloth.Все люди в королевстве слышали об этой чудесной ткани.
All were eager to learn how wise or how foolish their neighbors might be.Всем не терпелось узнать, насколько мудрыми или глупыми могут быть их соседи.eager - [ˈiːgə] - жаждущий
neighbor - [ˈneɪbə] - сосед соседка
"I will send my faithful old wise man to the weavers," said the Emperor at last."Я пошлю своего верного старого мудреца к ткачам", - сказал наконец император.faithful - [ˈfeɪθf(ə)l] - верный
"He will be best able to see how the cloth looks."Он лучше всего сможет увидеть, как выглядит ткань.
He is a man of sense.Он человек здравомыслящий.sense - [sens] - чувство здравый смысл
No one can be better for his job than he is."Никто не может быть лучше для своей работы, чем он".
So the faithful old wise man went into the hall where the thieves were working with all their might at their empty looms.Итак, верный старый мудрец вошел в зал, где воры изо всех сил работали на своих пустых станках. thieves - [θiːvz] - воры
"What can be the meaning of this?" thought the old man, opening his eyes very wide."Что бы это могло значить?" - подумал старик, широко раскрыв глаза.
"I cannot find the least bit of thread on the looms.""Я не могу найти ни малейшего кусочка нити на ткацких станках".least - [liːst] - наименьший
However, he did not say his thoughts aloud.Однако он не высказал своих мыслей вслух.aloud - [əˈlaʊd] - вслух
The thieves asked him very kindly to be so good as to come nearer their looms.Воры очень любезно попросили его быть настолько любезным, чтобы подойти поближе к их ткацким станкам.kindly - [ˈkaɪndlɪ] - любезно
nearer - [ˈnɪərə] - ближе
Then, they asked him whether the cloth pleased him.Затем они спросили его, действительно ли понравилась ему ткань.whether - [ˈweðə] - действительно ли
They asked whether the colors were not very beautiful.Они спросили, действительно ли цвета не чересчур прекрасны.
All the time they were pointing to the empty frames.Все это время они указывали на пустые рамки.pointing - [ˈpɔɪntɪŋ] - указывание
frame - [freɪm] - рамка
The poor old wise man looked and looked.Бедный старый мудрец смотрел и смотрел.
He could not see anything on the looms for a very good reason.Он ничего не мог разглядеть на ткацких станках по очень веской причине.
There was nothing there.Там ничего не было.
"What!" thought he again."Что?" - снова подумал он.
"Is it possible that I am a fool?"Возможно ли, что я дурак?
I have never thought so myself.Я никогда так не думал о себе.
No one must know it now if I am so.Никто не должен знать об этом сейчас, если я такой.
Can it be, that I am unfit for my job?Может ли быть так, что я не гожусь для своей работы?
No, the Emperor must not know that either.Нет, император тоже не должен этого знать.either - [ˈaɪðə] - каждый тоже
I will never tell that I could not see the stuff."Я никогда не скажу, что не видел этого материала".
"Well, Sir!" said one of the weavers still pretending to work."Ну, сэр!" - сказал один из ткачей, все еще притворяясь, что работает.
"You do not say whether the cloth pleases you.""Вы не сказали, нравится ли вам эта ткань".
"Oh, it is excellent!" replied the old wise man, looking at the loom through his spectacles."О, она превосходна!" - ответил старый мудрец, глядя на ткацкий станок сквозь очки.excellent - [ˈeksələnt] - отлично
reply - [rɪˈplaɪ] - отвечать ответить
spectacles - [ˈspektəklz] - очки
"This pattern, and the colors."Этот узор и цвета.
Yes, I will tell the Emperor without delay, how very beautiful I think them."Да, я без промедления скажу императору, какими прекрасными я их считаю".
"We shall be much obliged to you," said the thieves."Мы будем вам очень признательны", - сказали ворыobliged - [əˈblaɪʤd] - обязанный
Then they named the many colors and described the pattern of the pretended stuff.Затем они назвали множество цветов и описали рисунок притворного материала.
The old wise man listened with care to their words so he might repeat them to the Emperor.Старый мудрец внимательно прислушивался к их словам, чтобы повторить их императору.
The thieves asked for more silk and gold saying that it was necessary to complete what they had begun.Воры попросили еще шелка и золота, сказав, что это необходимо, чтобы завершить то, что они начали.necessary - [necessary] - необходимый
Once again they put all that was given them into their knapsacks.Они снова сложили все, что им дали, в свои рюкзаки.Once again - [] - Еще раз
They went on working with as much effort as before at their empty looms.Они продолжали работать с таким же усердием, как и раньше, за своими пустыми станками.effort - [ˈefət] - усилие старание
The Emperor soon sent another man from his court to see how the weavers were getting on.Вскоре император послал еще одного человека из своего двора посмотреть, как идут дела у ткачей.soon - [suːn] - скоро
court - [kɔːt] - двор придворный
Now he wanted to know if the cloth would soon be ready.Теперь он хотел знать, скоро ли будет готова ткань.
It was just the same with this gentleman as with the wise man.С этим джентльменом было то же самое, что и с мудрецом.
First he looked closely at the looms on all sides.Сначала он внимательно осмотрел станки со всех сторон.closely - [ˈkləʊslɪ] - тщательно внимательно
He could see nothing at all but the empty frames.Он вообще ничего не видел, кроме пустых рамок.
"Does not the stuff appear as beautiful to you, as it did to my lord the wise man?" asked the thieves of the Emperor’s second advisor."Разве эта штука не кажется вам такой же прекрасной, как и моему господину мудрецу?" - спросили воры второго советника императора.advisor - [ədˈvaɪzə] - советник
"I certainly am not stupid!" thought the man."Я, конечно, не дурак!" - подумал мужчина.certainly - [ˈsɜːtnlɪ] - конечно
"It must be, that I am not fit for my good job!"Должно быть, я не гожусь для своей хорошей работы!
That is very odd.Это очень странно.odd - [ɒd] - странный
However, no one shall know anything about it."Однако никто ничего не должен знать об этом".
And so he praised the stuff he could not see.И поэтому он хвалил то, чего не мог видеть.praise - [preɪz] - хвалить
He declared that he was happy with both colors and patterns.Он заявил, что доволен как цветами, так и узорами.
"Indeed, your Imperial Majesty," he said to his emperor when he returned."Действительно, ваше императорское величество", - сказал он своему императору, когда вернулся.Majesty - [ˈmæʤɪstɪ] - Величество
"The cloth which the weavers are preparing is extraordinarily magnificent.""Ткань, которую готовят ткачи, необычайно великолепна".extraordinarily - [ɪksˈtrɔːdnrɪlɪ] - необычайно
magnificent - [mægˈnɪfɪsnt] - великолепный
The whole city was talking of the splendid cloth, which the Emperor had ordered to be woven.Весь город говорил о великолепной ткани, которую император приказал соткать.whole - [həʊl] - весь
woven - [ˈwəʊvən] - сотканный соткали
Finally, the Emperor himself wished to see the costly material while it was still in the loom.Наконец, сам император пожелал увидеть дорогостоящий материал, пока он еще находился на ткацком станке.costly - [ˈkɒstlɪ] - дорогостоящий
He took many officers of the court and the two honest men who had already admired the cloth.Он взял с собой многих придворных чиновников и двух честных людей, которые уже восхищались тканью.honest - [ˈɒnɪst] - честный
admire - [ədˈmaɪə] - восхищаться
As soon as the weavers saw the Emperor approach, they went on working faster than ever although they still did not pass even one thread through the looms.Как только ткачи увидели приближающегося Императора, они продолжили работать быстрее, чем когда-либо, хотя все еще не пропустили ни одной нити через ткацкие станки.approach - [əˈprəʊʧ] - приближение
although - [ɔːlˈðəʊ] - хотя несмотря на то
"Is not the work absolutely magnificent?" said the two officers of the crown, already mentioned."Разве эта работа не великолепна?" сказали два офицера короны, уже упоминавшиеся.crown - [kraʊn] - корона
"If your Majesty will only be pleased to look at it!"Если бы только вашему величеству было угодно взглянуть на это!pleased - [pliːzd] - угодный
What a splendid design!Какой великолепный дизайн!
What glorious colors!" and at the same time they pointed to the empty frames; for they imagined that everyone else could see this exquisite piece of workmanship.Какие великолепные цвета!" и в то же время они указывали на пустые рамы, так как воображали, что все остальные могут увидеть это изысканное произведение искусства.glorious - [ˈglɔːrɪəs] - славный восхитительный
imagine - [ɪˈmæʤɪn] - воображать
exquisite - [ɪkˈskwɪzɪt] - изысканный
workmanship - [ˈwɜːkmənʃɪp] - мастерство
"How is this?" said the Emperor to himself."Как же так?" - сказал себе император.
"I can see nothing!"Я ничего не вижу!
This is indeed a terrible affair!Это действительно ужасное дело!affair - [əˈfeə] - дело
Am I a simpleton, or am I unfit to be an Emperor?Я простак или я не гожусь на роль Императора?
That would be the worst thing that could happen!"Это было бы худшее, что могло случиться!"worst - [wɜːst] - наихудший
"Oh, the cloth is charming," said he, aloud."О, ткань очаровательна", - сказал он вслух.charming - [ˈʧɑːmɪŋ] - очаровательный
"I approve of it completely.""Я полностью одобряю это".approve - [əˈpruːv] - одобрять
He smiled most graciously and looked closely at the empty looms.Он очень любезно улыбнулся и внимательно посмотрел на пустые ткацкие станки.graciously - [ˈgreɪʃəslɪ] - любезно
No way would he say that he could not see what two of his advisors had praised so much.Он ни за что не сказал бы, что не видит того, что так хвалили два его советника.
Everyone with the Emperor now strained his or her eyes hoping to discover something on the looms, but they could see no more than the others.Все, кто был с Императором, теперь напрягали глаза, надеясь обнаружить что-нибудь на станках, но они могли видеть не больше, чем остальные.strained - [streɪnd] - напряженный
discover - [dɪsˈkʌvə] - обнаруживать
"Magnificent! Charming! Excellent!" was called out on all sides."Великолепно! Очаровательно! Отлично!" - раздалось со всех сторон.
Everyone was very cheerful.Все были очень веселы.cheerful - [ˈʧɪəf(ə)l] - веселый
The Emperor was pleased.Император был доволен.
He presented the weavers with the emblem of an order of knighthood.Он подарил ткачам эмблему рыцарского ордена.presented - [prɪˈzentɪd] - Предоставил подарил
knighthood - [ˈnaɪthʊd] - рыцарство
The thieves sat up the whole of the night before the day on which the parade was to take place.Воры просидели всю ночь перед днем, в который должен был состояться парад.parade - [pəˈreɪd] - парад
They had sixteen lights burning so that everyone might see how anxious they were to finish the Emperor’s new suit.У них горело шестнадцать ламп, чтобы все могли видеть, как им не терпится закончить новый костюм Императора.anxious - [ˈæŋkʃəs] - озабоченный
They pretended to roll the cloth off the looms.Они притворились, что снимают ткань с ткацких станков.
They cut the air with their scissors and sewed with needles without any thread in them.Они резали воздух ножницами и шили иглами без всякой нити в них.scissors - [ˈsɪzəz] - ножницы
needle - [niːdl] - игла
sew - [səʊ] - шить
"See!" cried they, at last."Смотрите!" - воскликнули они наконец.
"The Emperor’s new clothes are ready!""Новая одежда императора готова!"
The Emperor, with all the grandees of his court, came to the weavers.Император со всеми вельможами своего двора пришел к ткачам.grandee - [grænˈdiː] - вельможа
The thieves raised their arms, as if in the act of holding something up.Воры подняли руки, как будто хотели что-то поднять.raise - [reɪz] - поднимать
act - [ækt] - действие
"Here are your Majesty’s trousers!"Вот брюки вашего величества!trousers - [ˈtraʊzəz] - брюки штаны
Here is the scarf!Вот этот шарф!scarf - [skɑːf] - шарф
Here is the mantle!Вот мантия!mantle - [mæntl] - мантия
The whole suit is as light as a cobweb; one might fancy one has nothing at all on, when dressed in it."Весь костюм легкий, как паутинка; можно подумать, что на тебе вообще ничего нет, когда ты в нем одет".cobweb - [ˈkɒbweb] - паутина
"Yes indeed!" said all the courtiers, although not one of them could see anything of this special cloth."Да, действительно!" - сказали все придворные, хотя никто из них не мог видеть ничего из этой особой ткани.
The Emperor was undressed for a fitting, and the thieves pretended to array him in his new suit.Императора раздели для примерки, и воры сделали вид, что облачают его в новый костюм.fitting - [ˈfɪtɪŋ] - примерка
array - [əˈreɪ] - одеть
The Emperor turned round and from side to side before the looking glass.Император повернулся кругом и из стороны в сторону перед зеркалом.
"How splendid his Majesty looks in his new clothes, and how well they fit!" everyone cried out."Как великолепно выглядит его величество в своей новой одежде, и как хорошо она сидит!" - воскликнули все.
"What a design!Какой дизайн!
What colors!Какие цвета!
These are indeed royal robes!"Это действительно королевские одежды!"royal - [ˈrɔɪəl] - королевский
robe - [rəʊb] - одежда мантия
"I am quite ready," said the Emperor."Я вполне готов", - сказал император.
He appeared to be examining his handsome suit.Казалось, он разглядывал свой красивый костюм.appeare - [əˈpɪə] - казаться выглядеть
examining - [ɪgˈzæmɪnɪŋ] - изучающий рассматривающий
handsome - [ˈhænsəm] - красивый
The lords of the bedchamber, who were to carry his Majesty’s train felt about on the ground as if they were lifting up the ends of the mantle.Лорды опочивальни, которые должны были нести шлейф его Величества, ощупывали землю, как будто приподнимали концы мантии.
Then they pretended to be carrying something for they would by no means want to appear foolish or not fit for their jobs.Затем они притворились, что что-то несут, потому что ни в коем случае не хотели показаться глупыми или непригодными для своей работы.
The Emperor walked under his high canopy in the midst of the procession, through the streets of his capital.Император шел под своим высоким балдахином в середине процессии по улицам своей столицы.canopy - [ˈkænəpɪ] - навес
All the people standing by, and those at the windows, cried out, "Oh!Все люди, стоявшие рядом, и те, кто стоял у окон, закричали: "О!
How beautiful are our Emperor’s new clothes!Как прекрасны новые одежды нашего императора!
What a magnificent train there is to the mantle; and how gracefully the scarf hangs!"Какой великолепный шлейф у мантии, и как изящно висит шарф!" gracefully - [ˈgreɪsfəlɪ] - изящно
No one would admit these much admired clothes could not be seen because, in doing so, he would have been saying he was either a simpleton or unfit for his job.Никто не признался бы, что эту вызывающую восхищение одежду нельзя было увидеть, потому что, поступая так, он сказал бы, что он либо простак, либо непригоден для своей работы.admit - [ədˈmɪt] - признавать
"But the Emperor has nothing at all on!" said a little child."Но на императоре вообще ничего нет!" - сказал маленький ребенок.
"Listen to the voice of the child!" exclaimed his father."Прислушайтесь к голосу ребенка!" - воскликнул его отец.
What the child had said was whispered from one to another.То, что сказал ребенок, передавалось шепотом от одного к другому.
"But he has nothing at all on!" at last cried out all the people."Но на нем совсем ничего нет!" - наконец закричали все люди.
The Emperor was upset, for he knew that the people were right.Император был расстроен, ибо знал, что народ прав.upset - [ʌpˈset] - расстроенный
However, he thought the procession must go on now!Однако он считал, что процессия должна продолжаться прямо сейчас!
The lords of the bedchamber took greater pains than ever, to appear holding up a train, although, in reality, there was no train to hold, and the Emperor walked on in his underwear.Лорды опочивальни прилагали больше усилий, чем когда-либо, чтобы казаться держащими шлейф, хотя на самом деле никакого шлейфа не было, и император шел дальше в нижнем белье.pains - [peɪnz] - страдания

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