Самоучебник по английскому

Меню

The Happy Prince

High above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince.

He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt.

He was very much admired indeed.

"He is a beautiful as a weathercock" remarked one of the Town Councilors who wished to gain a reputation for having artistic tastes; "only not quite so useful" he added, fearing lest people should think him unpractical, which he really was not.

"Why can't you be like the Happy Prince?" asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon. "The Happy Prince never dreams of crying for anything".

"I am glad there is is some one in the world who is quite happy" muttered a disappointed man as he gazed at the wonderful statue.

"He looks just like an angel" said the Charity Children as they came out of the cathedral in their bright scarlet cloaks and their clean white pinafores.

"How do you know?" said the Mathematical Master, "you have never seen one".

"Ah! but we have, in our dreams" answered the children: and the Mathematical Master frowned and looked very severe, for he did not approve of children dreaming.

One night there flew over the city a little Swallow. His friends had gone away to Egypt six weeks before, but he had stayed behind, for he was in love with the most beautiful Reed.

He had met her early in the spring as he was flying down the river after a big yellow moth, and had been so attracted by her slender waist that he had stopped to talk to her.

"Shall I love you" said the Swallow, who liked to come to the point at once, and the Reed made him a low bow. So he flew round and round her, touching the water with his wings, and making silver ripples.

This was his courtship, and it lasted all through the summer.

"It is a ridiculous attachment" twittered the other Swallows; "she has no money, and far too many relations"; and indeed the river was quite full of Reeds.

Then, when the autumn came they all flew away.

After they had gone he left lonely, and began to tire of his lady-love. "She has no conversation" he said "and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind".

And certainly, whenever the wind blew, the Reed made the most graceful curtseys.

"Will you come away with me?" he said finally to her, but the Reed shook her head, she was so attached to her home.

"You have been trifling with me" he cried. "I am off to the Pyramids, Good-bye!" and he flew away.

All day long he flew, and at night-time he arrived at the city. "Where shall I put up?" he said; "I hope the town has made preparations."

Then he saw the statue on the tall column.

"I will put up there," he cried; "it is a fine position, with plenty of fresh air."

So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince.

"I have a golden bedroom, he said softly to himself as he looked round, and he prepared to go to sleep; but just as he was putting his head under his wing a large drop of water fell on him.

"What a curious thing!" he cried; "there is not a single cloud in the sky, the stars are quite clear and bright, and yet it is raining. The climate in the north of Europe is really dreadful. The Reed used to like the rain, but that was merely her selfishness."

Then another drop fell. "What is the use of a statue if it cannot keep the rain off?" he said; "I must look for a good chimney-pot," and determined to fly away.

But before he had opened his wings, a third drop fell, and he looked up, and saw - Ah! what did he see?

The eyes of the Happy Prince were filled with tears, and tears were running down his golden cheeks. His face was so beautiful in the moonlight that the little Swallow was filled with pity.

"Who are you?" he said. "I am the Happy Prince." "Why are you weeping then?" asked the Swallow, "you have quite drenched me."

"When I was alive and had a human heart," answered the statue, "I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the Palace of Sans-Souci, where sorrow is not allowed to enter. In the daytime I played with my companions in the garden, and in the evening I led the dance in the Great Hall. Round the garden ran a very lofty wall, but I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything about me was so beautiful. My courtiers called me the Happy Prince, and happy indeed I was, if pleasure be happiness.

So I lived, and so I died. And now that I am dead they have set me up here so high that I can see all the ugliness and all the misery of my city, and though my heart is made of lead yet I cannot chose but weep."

"What! is he not solid gold?" said the Swallow to himself. He was too polite to make any personal remarks out loud.

"Far away," continued the statue in a low musical voice, "far away in a little street there is a poor house. One of the windows is open, and through it I can see a woman seated at a table. Her face is thin and worn, and she has coarse red hands all pricked by the needle, for she is a seamstress. She is embroidering passion-flowers on a satin gown for the liveliest of the Queen's maids-of-honour to wear at the next Court-ball.

In a bed in the corner of the room her little boy is lying ill. He has a fever, and is asking for oranges. His mother has nothing to give him but river water, so he is crying. Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow, will you not bring her the ruby out of my sword-hilt? My feet are fastened to this pedestal and I cannot move."

"I am waited for in Egypt," said the Swallow. "My friends are flying up and down the Nile, and talking to the large lotus-flowers. Soon they will go to sleep in the tomb of the great King. The King is there himself in his painted coffin. He is wrapped in yellow linen, and embalmed with spices. Round his neck is a chain of pale green jade, and his hands are like withered leaves."

"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me for one night, and be my messenger? The boy is so thirsty, and the mother so sad."

"I don't think I like boys," answered the Swallow. "Last summer, when I was staying on the river, there were two rude boys, the miller's sons, who were always throwing stones at me.

They never hit me, of course; we swallows fly far too well for that, and besides, I come of a family famous for its agility; but still, it was a mark of disrespect."

But the Happy Prince looked so sad that the little Swallow was sorry. "It is very cold here," he said; "but I will stay with you for one night, and be your messenger."

"Thank you, little Swallow," said the Prince.

So the Swallow picked out the great ruby from the Prince's sword, and flew away with it in his beak over the roofs of the town.

He passed by the cathedral tower, where the white marble angels were sculptured. He passed by the palace and heard the sound of dancing. A beautiful girl came out on the balcony with her lover. "How wonderful the stars are," he said to her. "and how wonderful is power of love!"

"I hope my dress will be ready in time for the State-ball," she answered; "I have ordered passion-flowers to be embroidered on it; but the seamstresses are so lazy."

He passed over the river, and saw the lanterns hanging to the masts of the ships. At last he came to the poor house and looked in.

The boy was tossing feverishly on his bed, and the mother had fallen asleep, she was so tired. In he hopped, and laid the great ruby on the table beside the woman's thimble. Then he flew gently round the bed, fanning the boy's forehead with his wings.

"How cool I feel," said the boy, "I must be getting better"; and he sank into a delicious slumber.

Then the Swallow flew back to the Happy Prince, and told him what he had done. "It is curious," he remarked, "but I feel quite warm now, although it is so cold."

"That is because you have done a good action," said the Prince. And the little Swallow began to think, and then he fell asleep. Thinking always made him sleepy.

When day broke he flew down to the river and had a bath. "What a remarkable phenomenon," said the Professor of Ornithology as he was passing over the bridge. "A swallow in winter!" And he wrote a long letter about it to the local newspaper.

Every one quoted it, it was full of so many words that they could not understand.

"To-night I go to Egypt," said the Swallow, and he was in high spirits at the prospect. He visited all public monuments, and sat a long time on top of the church steeple. Wherever he went the Sparrows chirruped, and said to each other, "What a distinguished stranger!" so he enjoyed himself very much.

When the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince. "Have you any commissions for Egypt? he cried; "I am just starting."

"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me one night longer?"

"I am waited for in Egypt," answered the Swallow. "To-morrow my friends will fly up to the Second Cataract. The river-horse couches there among the bulrushes, and on a great granite throne sits the God Memnon.

"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "far away across the city I see a young man in a garret. He is leaning over a desk covered with papers, and in a tumbler by his side there is a bunch of withered violets."

"His hair is brown and crisp, and his lips are red as a pomegranate, and he has large and dreamy eyes. He is trying to finish a play for Director of the Theater, but he is too cold to write any more. There is no fire in the grate, and hunger has made him faint."

"I will wait with you one night longer," said the Swallow, who really had a good heart. "Shall I take him another ruby?"

"Alas! I have no ruby now," said the Prince; "my eyes are all that I have left. They are made of rare sapphires, which were brought out of India a thousand years ago. Pluck out one of them and take it to him. He will sell it to the jeweler, and buy food and firewood, and finish his play."

"Dear Prince," said the Swallow, "I cannot do that"; and he began to weep. "Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "do as I command you."

So the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye, and flew away to the student's garret. It was easy enough to get in, as they was a hole in the roof. Through this he darted, and came into the room.

The young man had his head buried in his hands, so he did not hear the flutter of the bird's wings, and when he looked up he found the beautiful sapphire lying on the withered violets.

"I am beginning to be appreciated," he cried; "this is from some great admirer. Now I can finish my play," and he looked quite happy.

The next day the Swallow flew down to the harbor. He sat on the mast of a large vessel and watched the sailors hauling big chests out of the hold with ropes.

"Heave ahoy!" they shouted as each chest came up. "I am going to Egypt!" cried the Swallow, but nobody mined, and when moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince.

"I am come to bid you good bye," he cried. "Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me one night longer?"

"It is winter," answered the Swallow, "and the chill snow will soon be here. In Egypt the sun is warm on the green palm trees, and the crocodiles lie in the mud and look lazily about them.

"Dear Prince, I must leave you, but I will never forget you, and next spring I will bring you back two beautiful jewels in place of those you have given away. The ruby shall be redder than a red rose, and the sapphire shall be as blue as the great sea."

"In the square below," said the Happy Prince, "there stands a little match girl. She has let her matches fall in the matches fall in the gutter, and they are all spoiled. Her father will beat her if she does not bring home some money, and she is crying. She has no shoes or stocking, and her little head is bare. Pluck out my other eye, and give it to her, and her father will not beat her."

"I will stay with you one night longer," said the Swallow, "but I cannot pluck out your eye. You would be quite blind then."

"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "do as I command you."

So he plucked out the Prince's other eye, and darted down with it. He swooped past the match girl, and slipped the jewel into the palm of her hand. "What a lovely bit of glass," cried the little girl; and she ran home, laughing.

Then the Swallow came back to the Prince. "You are blind now," he said, "so I will stay with you always."

"No, little Swallow," said the poor Prince, "you must go away to Egypt.

"I will stay with you always," said the Swallow, and he slept at the Prince's feet.

All the next day he sat on the Prince's shoulder, and told him stories of what he had seen in strange lands.

He told him of the red ibises, who stand in long rows on the banks of the Nile, and catch gold-fish in their beaks; of the Sphinx, who is as old as the world itself, and lives in the desert, and knows everything;

"Dear little Swallow," said the Prince, "you tell me of marvellous things, but more marvelous than anything is the suffering of the men and women. There is no Mystery so great Misery. Fly over my city, little Swallow, and tell me what you see there."

So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates.

He flew into dark lanes, and saw the white faces of starving children looking out listlessly at the black streets.

Under the archway of a bridge two little boys were lying in one another's arms to try and keep themselves warm. "How hungry we are!" they said. "You must not lie here," shouted the Watchman, and they wandered out into the rain.

Then he flew back and told the Prince what he had seen.

"I am covered with fine gold," said the Prince, "you must take it off, leaf by leaf, and give it to my poor; the living always think that goldcan make them happy."

Leaf after leaf of the fine gold the Swallow picked off, till the Happy Prince looked quite dull and grey.

Leaf after leaf of the fine gold he brought the the poor, and the children's faces grew rosier, and they laughed and played games in the street. "We have bread now!" they cried.

Then the snow came, and after the snow came the frost. The streets looked as if they were made of silver, they were so bright and glistening; long icicles like crystal daggers hung down from the eaves of the houses, everybody went about in furs, and the little boys wore scarlet caps and skated on the ice.

The poor little Swallow grew colder and colder, but he would not leave the Prince, he loved him too well. He picked up crumbs outside the baker's door when the baker was not looking and tried to keep himself warm by flapping his wings.

But at last he knew that he was going to die. He had just strength to fly up to the Prince's shoulder once more. "Goodbye, dear Prince!" he murmured "will you let me kiss your hand?"

"I am glad that you are going to Egypt at last, little Swallow," said the Prince "you have stayed too long here; but you must kiss me on the lips, for I love you."

"It is not to Egypt that I am going," said the Swallow. "I am going to the House of Death. Death is the brother of Sleep, is he not?"

And he kissed the Happy Prince on the lips, and fell down dead at his feet.

At that moment a curious crack sounded inside the statue, as if something had broken. The fact is that the leaden heart had snapped right in two. It certainly was a dreadfully hard frost.

Early the next morning the Mayor was walking in the square below in company with the Town Councillors. As they passed the column he looked up at the statue: "Dear me! How shabby the Happy Prince looks!" he said.

"How shabby indeed!" cried the Town Councillors, who always agreed with the Mayor, and they went up to look at it.

"The ruby has fallen out of his sword, his eyes are gone, and he is golden no longer," said the Mayor "in fact, he is little better than a beggar!"

"Little better than a beggar," said the Town Councillors.

"And here is actually a dead bird at his feet!" continued the Mayor. "We must really issue a proclamation that birds are not to be allowed to die here." And the Town Clerk made a note of the suggestion.

So they pulled down the statue of the Happy Prince. "As he is no longer beautiful he is no longer useful," said the Art Professor at the University.

Then they melted the statue in a furnace, and the Mayor held a meeting of the Corporation to decide what was to be done with the metal. "We must have another statue, of course," he said. "and it shall be a statue of myself."

"Of myself," said each of the Town Councillors, and they quarrelled. When I last heard of them they were quarrelling still.

"What a strange thing!" said the overseer of the workmen at the foundry. "This broken lead heart will not melt in the furnace. We must throw it away." So they threw it on a dust heap where the dead Swallow was also lying.

"Bring me the two most precious things in the city," said God to one of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird.

"You have rightly chosen," said God, "for in my garden of Paradise this little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince shall praise me."

The End

Таблица для изучения текста.

High above the city, on a tall column, stood the statue of the Happy Prince.Высоко над городом, на высокой колонне, стояла статуя Счастливого принца.statue - [ˈstæʧuː] - статуя
He was gilded all over with thin leaves of fine gold, for eyes he had two bright sapphires, and a large red ruby glowed on his sword-hilt.Он был весь покрыт тонкими листьями чистого золота, вместо глаз у него были два ярких сапфира, а на рукояти его меча сиял большой красный рубин.gilded - [ˈgɪldɪd] - позолоченный
sapphire - [ˈsæfaɪə] - сапфир
ruby - [ˈruːbɪ] - рубин
glow - [gləʊ] - светиться
sword-hilt - [sɔːd-hɪlt] - рукоять меча
He was very much admired indeed.Им действительно очень восхищались.
"He is a beautiful as a weathercock" remarked one of the Town Councilors who wished to gain a reputation for having artistic tastes; "only not quite so useful" he added, fearing lest people should think him unpractical, which he really was not."Он красив, как флюгер", - заметил один из членов городского совета, желавший приобрести репутацию человека с художественными вкусами; "только не такой полезный", - добавил он, опасаясь, что люди сочтут его непрактичным, которым он на самом деле не был.weathercock - [ˈweðəkɒk] - флюгер
Councilor - [ˈkaʊnsələr] - Советник
gain - [geɪn] - получать приобретать
taste - [teɪst] - вкус
fearing - [ˈfɪərɪŋ] - опасаясь
lest - [lest] - чтобы не, из боязни
"Why can't you be like the Happy Prince?" asked a sensible mother of her little boy who was crying for the moon."Почему ты не можешь быть похожим на Счастливого принца?" - спросила разумная мать своего маленького мальчика, который плакал по ночам.sensible - [ˈsensəbl] - здравомыслящий
"The Happy Prince never dreams of crying for anything"."Счастливый принц никогда не мечтает ни о чем плакать". ("Счастливый Принц ни за что не стал бы плакать".)
"I am glad there is is some one in the world who is quite happy" muttered a disappointed man as he gazed at the wonderful statue."Я рад, что в мире есть кто-то, кто вполне счастлив", - пробормотал разочарованный мужчина, глядя на чудесную статую.mutter - [ˈmʌtə] - бормотать
disappointed - [dɪsəˈpɔɪntɪd] - разочарованный
gaze - [geɪz] - вглядываться
"He looks just like an angel" said the Charity Children as they came out of the cathedral in their bright scarlet cloaks and their clean white pinafores."Он похож на ангела", - сказали дети благотворительной школы, выходя из собора в своих ярко-алых плащах и чистых белых передниках.angel - [ˈeɪnʤəl] - ангел
Charity - [ˈʧærɪtɪ] - Благотворительность
scarlet - [ˈskɑːlɪt] - алый
cloak - [kləʊk] - плащ
pinafore - [ˈpɪnəfɔː] - передник
"How do you know?" said the Mathematical Master, "you have never seen one"."Откуда ты знаешь? - спросил Учитель математики. - Ты никогда их не видел".
"Ah!"ах!
but we have, in our dreams" answered the children: and the Mathematical Master frowned and looked very severe, for he did not approve of children dreaming.но у нас есть, в наших мечтах", - ответили дети, и Учитель математики нахмурился и выглядел очень суровым, потому что он не одобрял, когда дети мечтают.frown - [fraʊn] - нахмуриться
severe - [sɪˈvɪə] - суровый
One night there flew over the city a little Swallow.Однажды ночью над городом пролетела маленькая Ласточка.Swallow - [ˈswɒləʊ] - ласточка
His friends had gone away to Egypt six weeks before, but he had stayed behind, for he was in love with the most beautiful Reed.Его друзья уехали в Египет шесть недель назад, но он остался, потому что был влюблен в самую красивую Тростинку.Egypt - [ˈɪʤɪpt] - Египет
He had met her early in the spring as he was flying down the river after a big yellow moth, and had been so attracted by her slender waist that he had stopped to talk to her.Он встретил ее ранней весной, когда летел вниз по реке за большим желтым мотыльком, и его так привлекла ее тонкая талия, что он остановился, чтобы поговорить с ней.attract - [əˈtrækt] - привлекать
slender - [ˈslendə] - стройный
waist - [weɪst] - талия
"Shall I love you" said the Swallow, who liked to come to the point at once, and the Reed made him a low bow."Буду ли я любить тебя", - сказала Ласточка, которая любила сразу переходить к делу, и Тростинка низко поклонилась ему.Reed - [rɪd] - Тростник
bow - [bəʊ] - поклон
So he flew round and round her, touching the water with his wings, and making silver ripples.Поэтому он летал вокруг нее, касаясь воды крыльями и создавая серебряную рябь.wings - [wɪŋz] - крылья
ripples - [rɪpls] - рябь
This was his courtship, and it lasted all through the summer.Это было его ухаживание, и оно длилось все лето.courtship - [ˈkɔːʧɪp] - ухаживание
"It is a ridiculous attachment" twittered the other Swallows; "she has no money, and far too many relations"; and indeed the river was quite full of Reeds."Это нелепая привязанность", - щебетали другие Ласточки; "У нее нет денег и слишком много родственников"; и действительно, река была полна Тростника.ridiculous - [rɪˈdɪkjʊləs] - нелепый
attachment - [əˈtæʧmənt] - привязанность
twitter - [ˈtwɪtə] - щебетать хихикать
Then, when the autumn came they all flew away.Потом, когда наступила осень, они все улетели.
After they had gone he left lonely, and began to tire of his lady-love.После того как они ушли, он остался один и начал разочаровываться в своей возлюбленной.tire - [ˈtaɪə] - уставать надоесть
"She has no conversation" he said "and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind"."Она не разговаривает, - сказал он, - и я боюсь, что она кокетка, потому что она всегда флиртует с ветром".conversation - [kɒnvəˈseɪʃn] - разговор беседа
coquette - [kɒˈkɛt] - кокетка
flirting - [ˈflɜːtɪŋ] - флирт
And certainly, whenever the wind blew, the Reed made the most graceful curtseys.И конечно, всякий раз, когда дул ветер, Тростник делал самые изящные реверансы.whenever - [wenˈevə] - всякий раз, когда
curtsey - [ˈkɜːtsɪ] - реверанс поклон
"Will you come away with me?" he said finally to her, but the Reed shook her head, she was so attached to her home."Ты уйдешь со мной?" - наконец сказал он ей, но Тростинка покачала головой, она была так привязана к своему дому.attached - [əˈtæʧt] - прикрепленный
"You have been trifling with me" he cried."Вы шутите со мной", - воскликнул он.trifle - [traɪfl] - шутить
"I am off to the Pyramids, Good-bye!" and he flew away."Я ухожу к Пирамидам, до свидания!" - и он улетел.pyramid - [ˈpɪrəmɪd] - пирамида
All day long he flew, and at night-time he arrived at the city.Весь день он летел, а ночью прибыл в город.
"Where shall I put up?" he said; "I hope the town has made preparations.""Где мне остановиться?" он сказал: "Я надеюсь, что город подготовился".
Then he saw the statue on the tall column.Затем он увидел статую на высокой колонне.
"I will put up there," he cried; "it is a fine position, with plenty of fresh air.""Я остановлюсь там, - воскликнул он, - это прекрасное место, с большим количеством свежего воздуха".plenty - [ˈplentɪ] - множество
So he alighted just between the feet of the Happy Prince.Поэтому он приземлился как раз между ног Счастливого принца.alight - [əˈlaɪt] - приземляться
"I have a golden bedroom, he said softly to himself as he looked round, and he prepared to go to sleep; but just as he was putting his head under his wing a large drop of water fell on him."У меня золотая спальня", - тихо сказал он себе, оглядываясь по сторонам, и приготовился заснуть; но как только он сунул голову под крыло, на него упала большая капля воды.
"What a curious thing!" he cried; "there is not a single cloud in the sky, the stars are quite clear and bright, and yet it is raining."Какая любопытная вещь!" он воскликнул: "На небе нет ни единого облачка, звезды совершенно ясные и яркие, и все же идет дождь.curious - [ˈkjʊərɪəs] - любопытный
The climate in the north of Europe is really dreadful.Климат на севере Европы действительно ужасный.climate - [ˈklaɪmɪt] - климат
The Reed used to like the rain, but that was merely her selfishness."Тростинке раньше нравился дождь, но это был просто ее эгоизм."merely - [ˈmɪəlɪ] - просто
selfishness - [ˈselfɪʃnɪs] - эгоизм
Then another drop fell.Затем упала еще одна капля.
"What is the use of a statue if it cannot keep the rain off?" he said; "I must look for a good chimney-pot," and determined to fly away."Какая польза от статуи, если она не может защитить от дождя?" он сказал: "Я должен поискать хороший дымоход", - и решил улететь.chimney-pot - [ˈʧɪmnɪ-pɒt] - дымовая труба
determine - [dɪˈtɜːmɪn] - определять решать
But before he had opened his wings, a third drop fell, and he looked up, and saw - Ah!Но не успел он расправить крылья, как упала третья капля, и он поднял глаза и увидел - Ах!
what did he see?что он увидел?
The eyes of the Happy Prince were filled with tears, and tears were running down his golden cheeks.Глаза Счастливого принца наполнились слезами, и слезы текли по его золотистым щекам.cheek - [ʧiːk] - щека
His face was so beautiful in the moonlight that the little Swallow was filled with pity.Его лицо было так прекрасно в лунном свете, что маленькая Ласточка преисполнилась жалости.pity - [ˈpɪtɪ] - жалость
"Who are you?" he said."Кто ты?" - спросил он.
"I am the Happy Prince.""Я Счастливый принц".
"Why are you weeping then?" asked the Swallow, "you have quite drenched me.""Тогда почему ты плачешь?" - спросила Ласточка, - "Ты меня совсем промочил".drench - [drenʧ] - мочить заливать
"When I was alive and had a human heart," answered the statue, "I did not know what tears were, for I lived in the Palace of Sans-Souci, where sorrow is not allowed to enter."Когда я была жив и у меня было человеческое сердце, - ответила статуя, - я не знал, что такое слезы, потому что жила во Дворце Сан-Суси, куда печали не позволено входить.sorrow - [ˈsɒrəʊ] - печаль
allowed - [əˈlaʊd] - разрешено
In the daytime I played with my companions in the garden, and in the evening I led the dance in the Great Hall.Днем я играл со своими товарищами в саду, а вечером вел танцы в Большом зале.companion - [kəmˈpænɪən] - компаньон
Round the garden ran a very lofty wall, but I never cared to ask what lay beyond it, everything about me was so beautiful.Вокруг сада тянулась очень высокая стена, но мне никогда не хотелось спрашивать, что находится за ней, все во мне было так прекрасно.lofty - [ˈlɒftɪ] - возвышенный
beyond - [bɪˈjɒnd] - вне за сверх после
My courtiers called me the Happy Prince, and happy indeed I was, if pleasure be happiness.Мои придворные называли меня Счастливым принцем, и я действительно был счастлив, если удовольствие - это счастье.
So I lived, and so I died.Так я жил, и так я умер.
And now that I am dead they have set me up here so high that I can see all the ugliness and all the misery of my city, and though my heart is made of lead yet I cannot chose but weep."И теперь, когда я мертв, они поместили меня здесь так высоко, что я могу видеть все уродство и все страдания моего города, и хотя мое сердце сделано из свинца, все же я не могу не плакать".ugliness - [ˈʌglɪnɪs] - уродство безобразие
misery - [ˈmɪzərɪ] - нищета страдание
lead - [lead] - свинец
"What!"Что?
is he not solid gold?" said the Swallow to himself.разве он не из чистого золота?" сказал Ласточка самому себе.
He was too polite to make any personal remarks out loud.Он был слишком вежлив, чтобы высказывать какие-либо личные замечания вслух.polite - [pəˈlaɪt] - вежливый
personal - [ˈpɜːs(ə)nəl] - личный
remark - [rɪˈmɑːk] - замечание
loud - [laʊd] - громкий
"Far away," continued the statue in a low musical voice, "far away in a little street there is a poor house."Далеко отсюда, - продолжала статуя низким музыкальным голосом, - далеко на маленькой улочке есть бедный дом.
One of the windows is open, and through it I can see a woman seated at a table.Одно из окон открыто, и через него я вижу женщину, сидящую за столом.
Her face is thin and worn, and she has coarse red hands all pricked by the needle, for she is a seamstress.Лицо у нее худое и изможденное, и грубые красные руки исколотые иголкой, потому что она швея.worn - [wɔːn] - измученный измотанный
coarse - [kɔːs] - грубый
pricked - [prɪkt] - уколотый
seamstress - [ˈsiːmstrɪs] - швея
She is embroidering passion-flowers on a satin gown for the liveliest of the Queen's maids-of-honour to wear at the next Court-ball.Она вышивает цветы страсти на атласном платье для самой оживленной из фрейлин королевы, чтобы надеть его на следующий придворный бал.embroider - [ɪmˈbrɔɪdə] - вышивать
passion - [pæʃn] - страсть
gown - [gaʊn] - платье наряд
In a bed in the corner of the room her little boy is lying ill.На кровати в углу комнаты лежит больной ее маленький мальчик.
He has a fever, and is asking for oranges.У него жар, и он просит апельсины.
His mother has nothing to give him but river water, so he is crying.Его матери нечего ему дать, кроме речной воды, поэтому он плачет.
Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow, will you not bring her the ruby out of my sword-hilt?Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, не принесешь ли ты ей рубин из рукояти моего меча?
My feet are fastened to this pedestal and I cannot move."Мои ноги прикованы к этому пьедесталу, и я не могу пошевелиться".fasten - [fɑːsn] - прикреплять
pedestal - [ˈpedɪstl] - пьедестал
"I am waited for in Egypt," said the Swallow."Меня ждут в Египте", - сказала Ласточка.
"My friends are flying up and down the Nile, and talking to the large lotus-flowers."Мои друзья летают вверх и вниз по Нилу и разговаривают с большими цветами лотоса.Nile - [naɪl] - Нил
lotus - [ˈləʊtəs] - лотос
Soon they will go to sleep in the tomb of the great King.Скоро они отправятся спать в гробницу великого царя.tomb - [tuːm] - гробница
The King is there himself in his painted coffin.Король сам там в своем раскрашенном гробу.coffin - [ˈkɒfɪn] - гроб гробик
He is wrapped in yellow linen, and embalmed with spices.Он завернут в желтое полотно и набальзамирован специями.linen - [ˈlɪnɪn] - бельё полотно
embalm - [ɪmˈbɑːm] - бальзамировать
spices - [ˈspaɪsɪz] - специи
Round his neck is a chain of pale green jade, and his hands are like withered leaves."На шее у него цепочка из бледно-зеленого нефрита, а руки похожи на увядшие листья".chain - [ʧeɪn] - цепь
pale - [peɪl] - бледный тусклый
jade - [ʤeɪd] - нефрит
withered - [ˈwɪðəd] - высохший иссохший сморщенный
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me for one night, and be my messenger?"Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - не останешься ли ты со мной на одну ночь и не будешь ли моим посланником?
The boy is so thirsty, and the mother so sad."Мальчику так хочется пить, а матери так грустно".thirsty - [ˈθɜːstɪ] - жаждущий
"I don't think I like boys," answered the Swallow."Я не думаю, что мне нравятся мальчики", - ответила Ласточка.
"Last summer, when I was staying on the river, there were two rude boys, the miller's sons, who were always throwing stones at me."Прошлым летом, когда я жил на реке, там были два грубых мальчика, сыновья мельника, которые всегда бросали в меня камни.rude - [ruːd] - невежливый невоспитанный
miller - [ˈmɪlə] - мельник
stone - [stəʊn] - камень
They never hit me, of course; we swallows fly far too well for that, and besides, I come of a family famous for its agility; but still, it was a mark of disrespect."Они, конечно, никогда не попадали в меня; мы, ласточки, летаем слишком хорошо для этого, и, кроме того, я происхожу из семьи, известной своей ловкостью; но все же это был знак неуважения".far - [] - далеко
besides - [bɪˈsaɪdz] - кроме того
agility - [əˈʤɪlɪtɪ] - проворство ловкость
but still - [] - но все же
mark - [mɑːk] - знак
disrespect - [dɪsrɪsˈpekt] - неуважение
But the Happy Prince looked so sad that the little Swallow was sorry.Но Счастливый Принц выглядел таким печальным, что маленькой Ласточке стало жаль его.
"It is very cold here," he said; "but I will stay with you for one night, and be your messenger.""Здесь очень холодно, - сказал он, - но я останусь с вами на одну ночь и буду твоим посланником".
"Thank you, little Swallow," said the Prince."Спасибо тебе, маленькая Ласточка", - сказал принц.
So the Swallow picked out the great ruby from the Prince's sword, and flew away with it in his beak over the roofs of the town.И так Ласточка выбрала большой рубин из меча принца и улетела с ним в клюве над крышами города.pick - [pɪk] - ковырять выковыривать
beak - [biːk] - клюв
He passed by the cathedral tower, where the white marble angels were sculptured.Он проследовал мимо башни собора, где были изваяны ангелы из белого мрамора.cathedral - [kəˈθiːdrəl] - собор
tower - [ˈtaʊə] - башня
marble - [mɑːbl] - мрамор
sculptur - [ˈskʌlpʧə] - лепить изваять ваять
He passed by the palace and heard the sound of dancing.Он проследовал мимо дворца и услышал звуки танцев.
A beautiful girl came out on the balcony with her lover.Красивая девушка вышла на балкон со своим возлюбленным.
"How wonderful the stars are," he said to her."Как прекрасны звезды", - сказал он ей.
"and how wonderful is power of love!""и как прекрасна сила любви!"
"I hope my dress will be ready in time for the State-ball," she answered; "I have ordered passion-flowers to be embroidered on it; but the seamstresses are so lazy.""Я надеюсь, что мое платье будет готово к государственному балу", - ответила она; "Я приказала вышить на нем цветы страсти, но швеи такие ленивые".State - [steɪt] - государство
lazy - [ˈleɪzɪ] - ленивый
He passed over the river, and saw the lanterns hanging to the masts of the ships.Он пересек реку и увидел фонари, подвешенные к мачтам кораблей.lantern - [ˈlæntən] - фонарь
mast - [mɑːst] - мачта
At last he came to the poor house and looked in.Наконец он прибыл к бедному дому и заглянул внутрь.
The boy was tossing feverishly on his bed, and the mother had fallen asleep, she was so tired.Мальчик лихорадочно метался на своей кровати, а мать заснула, она так устала.tossing - [ˈtɒsɪŋ] - мечущийся
feverishly - [ˈfiːvərɪʃlɪ] - лихорадочно
In he hopped, and laid the great ruby on the table beside the woman's thimble.Он запрыгнул внутрь и положил большой рубин на стол рядом с наперстком женщины.hopped - [hɒpt] - запрыгнул
thimble - [θɪmbl] - наперсток
Then he flew gently round the bed, fanning the boy's forehead with his wings.Затем он мягко облетел вокруг кровати, обмахивая лоб мальчика крыльями.gently - [ˈʤentlɪ] - нежно мягко ласково
fan - [fæn] - обмахивать
forehead - [ˈfɒrɪd] - лоб
"How cool I feel," said the boy, "I must be getting better"; and he sank into a delicious slumber."Как мне хорошо, - сказал мальчик, - должно быть, мне становится лучше"; и он погрузился в восхитительный сон.delicious - [dɪˈlɪʃəs] - восхитительный
slumber - [ˈslʌmbə] - сон дремота
Then the Swallow flew back to the Happy Prince, and told him what he had done.Тогда Ласточка полетела обратно к Счастливому принцу и рассказала ему, что он сделал.
"It is curious," he remarked, "but I feel quite warm now, although it is so cold.""Любопытно, - заметил он, - но сейчас мне довольно тепло, хотя так холодно".
"That is because you have done a good action," said the Prince."Это потому, что ты совершил добрый поступок", - сказал принц.
And the little Swallow began to think, and then he fell asleep.И маленькая Ласточка задумалась, а потом заснула.
Thinking always made him sleepy.От размышлений его всегда клонило в сон.
When day broke he flew down to the river and had a bath.Когда рассвело, он слетал к реке и принял ванну.
"What a remarkable phenomenon," said the Professor of Ornithology as he was passing over the bridge."Какое замечательное явление", - сказал профессор орнитологии, проезжая по мосту.remarkable - [rɪˈmɑːkəbl] - замечательный
phenomenon - [fɪˈnɒmɪnən] - феномен
said - [sed] - сказал
Professor - [prəˈfesə] - Профессор
Ornithology - [ɔːnɪˈθɒləʤɪ] - Орнитология
"A swallow in winter!""Ласточка зимой!"
And he wrote a long letter about it to the local newspaper.И он написал об этом длинное письмо в местную газету.
Every one quoted it, it was full of so many words that they could not understand.Каждый цитировал ее, она была полна такого количества слов, что они не могли понять.quote - [kwəʊt] - цитировать
"To-night I go to Egypt," said the Swallow, and he was in high spirits at the prospect."Сегодня вечером я отправляюсь в Египет", - сказала Ласточка, и он был в приподнятом настроении от этой перспективы.spirit - [ˈspɪrɪt] - дух
prospect - [ˈprɒspekt] - перспектива
He visited all public monuments, and sat a long time on top of the church steeple.Он посетил все общественные памятники и долго сидел на вершине церковной колокольни.monument - [ˈmɒnjʊmənt] - памятник
steeple - [stiːpl] - шпиль колокольня
Wherever he went the Sparrows chirruped, and said to each other, "What a distinguished stranger!" so he enjoyed himself very much.Куда бы он ни шел, Воробьи чирикали и говорили друг другу: "Какой выдающийся незнакомец!" - так что он был очень доволен собой.Sparrow - [ˈspærəʊ] - воробей
chirrup - [ˈʧɪrəp] - щебетать
distinguished - [dɪsˈtɪŋgwɪʃt] - выдающийся
When the moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince.Когда взошла луна, он полетел обратно к Счастливому принцу.
"Have you any commissions for Egypt?"У тебя есть какие-нибудь поручения для Египта?commission - [kəˈmɪʃn] - поручение заказ
he cried; "I am just starting."он воскликнул: "Я отправляюсь".
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me one night longer?""Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - не останешься ли ты со мной еще на одну ночь?"
"I am waited for in Egypt," answered the Swallow."Меня ждут в Египте", - ответила Ласточка.
"To-morrow my friends will fly up to the Second Cataract."Завтра мои друзья полетят ко Второму Водопаду.Cataract - [ˈkætərækt] - водопад
The river-horse couches there among the bulrushes, and on a great granite throne sits the God Memnon.Речной конь возлежит там среди камышей, а на огромном гранитном троне восседает Бог Мемнон.couch - [couch] - диван ложе
bulrush - [ˈbʊlrʌʃ] - камыш
granite - [ˈgrænɪt] - гранит
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "far away across the city I see a young man in a garret."Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - далеко за городом я вижу молодого человека на чердаке.across - [əˈkrɒs] - за
garret - [ˈgærɪt] - чердак
He is leaning over a desk covered with papers, and in a tumbler by his side there is a bunch of withered violets."Он склонился над столом, заваленным бумагами, а в стакане рядом с ним лежит букет увядших фиалок".lean - [liːn] - наклониться
over - [ˈəʊvə] - над за по на в сверх поверх
desk - [desk] - письменный стол
tumbler - [ˈtʌmblə] - стакан бакал
bunch - [bʌntʃ] - букет
violet - [ˈvaɪəlɪt] - фиалка
"His hair is brown and crisp, and his lips are red as a pomegranate, and he has large and dreamy eyes."У него каштановые и жесткие волосы, губы красные, как гранат, и у него большие мечтательные глаза.crisp - [krɪsp] - кудрявый
lips - [lɪps] - губы
pomegranate - [ˈpɒmɪgrænɪt] - гранат
He is trying to finish a play for Director of the Theater, but he is too cold to write any more.Он пытается закончить пьесу для директора Театра, но ему слишком холодно, чтобы писать дальше.
There is no fire in the grate, and hunger has made him faint."В камине нет огня, и от голода он потерял сознание."grate - [greɪt] - камин
hunger - [ˈhʌŋgə] - голод
faint - [feɪnt] - обморок ослабший
"I will wait with you one night longer," said the Swallow, who really had a good heart."Я побуду с тобой еще одну ночь", - сказала Ласточка, у которой действительно было доброе сердце.
"Shall I take him another ruby?""Может, мне отнести ему еще один рубин?"
"Alas!"Увы!Alas - [əˈlæs] - Увы
I have no ruby now," said the Prince; "my eyes are all that I have left.Теперь у меня нет рубина, - сказал принц. - Мои глаза - это все, что у меня осталось.left - [left] - оставшийся
They are made of rare sapphires, which were brought out of India a thousand years ago.Они сделаны из редких сапфиров, которые были привезены из Индии тысячу лет назад.rare - [reə] - редкий
Pluck out one of them and take it to him.Вырви один из них и отнеси ему.Pluck - [plʌk] - выщипывать вырвать
He will sell it to the jeweler, and buy food and firewood, and finish his play."Он продаст его ювелиру, купит еды и дров и закончит свою пьесу".jeweler - [ˈʤuːələ] - ювелир
"Dear Prince," said the Swallow, "I cannot do that"; and he began to weep."Дорогой принц, - сказала Ласточка, - я не могу этого сделать", - и он заплакал.
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "do as I command you.""Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - делай, как я тебе приказываю".command - [kəˈmɑːnd] - приказ
So the Swallow plucked out the Prince's eye, and flew away to the student's garret.Поэтому Ласточка вырвала глаз принцу и улетела на чердак студента.
It was easy enough to get in, as they was a hole in the roof.Попасть внутрь было достаточно легко, так как у них была дыра в крыше.hole - [həʊl] - отверстие
Through this he darted, and came into the room.Через это он метнулся и вошел в комнату.dart - [dɑːt] - броситься ринуться
The young man had his head buried in his hands, so he did not hear the flutter of the bird's wings, and when he looked up he found the beautiful sapphire lying on the withered violets.Молодой человек обхватил голову руками, чтобы не слышать хлопанья птичьих крыльев, а когда поднял глаза, то увидел прекрасный сапфир, лежащий на увядших фиалках.buried - [ˈberɪd] - скрытый
"I am beginning to be appreciated," he cried; "this is from some great admirer."Меня начинают ценить, - воскликнул он, - это от какого-то большого поклонника.appreciate - [əˈpriːʃɪeɪt] - ценить
admirer - [ədˈmaɪərə] - поклонник
Now I can finish my play," and he looked quite happy.Теперь я могу закончить свою пьесу", и он выглядел вполне счастливым.
The next day the Swallow flew down to the harbor.На следующий день Ласточка полетела в гавань.harbor - [ˈhɑːbə] - гавань
He sat on the mast of a large vessel and watched the sailors hauling big chests out of the hold with ropes.Он сидел на мачте большого судна и наблюдал, как матросы вытаскивают большие сундуки из трюма с помощью веревок.vessel - [vesl] - судно
sailor - [ˈseɪlə] - моряк
haul - [hɔːl] - тащить
chest - [ʧest] - сундук
hold - [həʊld] - трюм
rope - [rəʊp] - веревка канат
"Heave ahoy!" they shouted as each chest came up."Поднимай на палубу!" кричали они каждый раз, когда ящик поднимался.Heave - [hiːv] - поднимать тянуть
ahoy - [əˈhɔɪ] - на палубе
"I am going to Egypt!" cried the Swallow, but nobody mined, and when moon rose he flew back to the Happy Prince."Я следую в Египет!" - закричал Ласточка, но никому не было до этого дела, и когда взошла луна, он полетел обратно к Счастливому Принцу.
"I am come to bid you good bye," he cried."Я пришел попрощаться с вами", - воскликнул он.bid - [bɪd] - желать
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me one night longer?""Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - не останешься ли ты со мной еще на одну ночь?"
"It is winter," answered the Swallow, "and the chill snow will soon be here."Сейчас зима, - ответила Ласточка, - и скоро здесь выпадет холодный снег.chill - [ʧɪl] - холод
In Egypt the sun is warm on the green palm trees, and the crocodiles lie in the mud and look lazily about them.В Египте солнце греет зеленые пальмы, а крокодилы лежат в грязи и лениво оглядываются по сторонам.mud - [mʌd] - грязь
"Dear Prince, I must leave you, but I will never forget you, and next spring I will bring you back two beautiful jewels in place of those you have given away."Дорогой принц, я должен покинуть тебя, но я никогда не забуду тебя, и следующей весной я верну тебе два прекрасных драгоценности вместо тех, что ты отдал.
The ruby shall be redder than a red rose, and the sapphire shall be as blue as the great sea."Рубин будет краснее красной розы, а сапфир будет таким же синим, как великое море".
"In the square below," said the Happy Prince, "there stands a little match girl."На площади внизу, - сказал Счастливый принц, - стоит маленькая девочка продающая спички.square - [skweə] - площадь
below - [bɪˈləʊ] - внизу ниже
match - [mæʧ] - спичка
She has let her matches fall in the matches fall in the gutter, and they are all spoiled.Она позволила своим спичкам упасть в сточную канаву, и все они испорчены.gutter - [ˈgʌtə] - водосточная канава
Her father will beat her if she does not bring home some money, and she is crying.Ее отец побьет ее, если она не принесет домой немного денег, и она плачет.
She has no shoes or stocking, and her little head is bare.На ней нет ни туфель, ни чулок, и ее маленькая головка непокрыта.shoes - [ʃuːz] - туфли
bare - [beə] - обнажать
Pluck out my other eye, and give it to her, and her father will not beat her."Вырви мне другой глаз и отдай его ей, и ее отец не будет бить ее".
"I will stay with you one night longer," said the Swallow, "but I cannot pluck out your eye."Я останусь с тобой еще на одну ночь, - сказала Ласточка, - но я не могу вырвать твой глаз.
You would be quite blind then."Тогда ты станешь совершенно слеп."blind - [blaɪnd] - слепой
"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "do as I command you.""Ласточка, Ласточка, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - делай, как я тебе приказываю".
So he plucked out the Prince's other eye, and darted down with it.И так он вырвал у принца второй глаз и бросился с ним вниз.
He swooped past the match girl, and slipped the jewel into the palm of her hand.Он пронесся мимо продавщицы спичек и вложил драгоценный камень в ее ладонь.slip - [slɪp] - сунуть подсунуть
palm - [pɑːm] - ладонь
"What a lovely bit of glass," cried the little girl; and she ran home, laughing."Какой прелестный кусочек стекла", - воскликнула маленькая девочка и, смеясь, побежала домой.
Then the Swallow came back to the Prince.Затем Ласточка вернулась к Принцу.
"You are blind now," he said, "so I will stay with you always.""Теперь ты слеп, - сказал он, - поэтому я останусь с тобой навсегда".
"No, little Swallow," said the poor Prince, "you must go away to Egypt."Нет, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал бедный принц, - ты должна уехать в Египет.
"I will stay with you always," said the Swallow, and he slept at the Prince's feet."Я всегда останусь с тобой", - сказала Ласточка и уснула у ног принца.
All the next day he sat on the Prince's shoulder, and told him stories of what he had seen in strange lands.Весь следующий день он сидел на плече принца и рассказывал ему истории о том, что видел в чужих краях.shoulder - [ˈʃəʊldə] - плечо
strange - [streɪnʤ] - чужой посторонний незнакомый
He told him of the red ibises, who stand in long rows on the banks of the Nile, and catch gold-fish in their beaks; of the Sphinx, who is as old as the world itself, and lives in the desert, and knows everything.Он рассказал ему о красных ибисах, которые стоят длинными рядами на берегах Нила и ловят клювами золотых рыбок; о Сфинксе, который стар, как сам мир, и живет в пустыне, и знает все.ibis - [ˈaɪbɪs] - ибис
bank - [bæŋk] - берег
desert - [ˈdezət] - пустыня
"Dear little Swallow," said the Prince, "you tell me of marvellous things, but more marvelous than anything is the suffering of the men and women."Дорогая маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц, - ты рассказываешь мне о чудесных вещах, но более поразительным, чем что-либо, являются страдания мужчин и женщин.marvellous - [ˈmɑːvələs] - поразительный удивительный
suffer - [ˈsʌfə] - страдать
There is no Mystery so great Misery.Нет Загадки более великой, чем Страдание.Mystery - [ˈmɪstərɪ] - тайна загадка
Fly over my city, little Swallow, and tell me what you see there."Пролети над моим городом, маленькая Ласточка, и скажи мне, что ты там видишь."
So the Swallow flew over the great city, and saw the rich making merry in their beautiful houses, while the beggars were sitting at the gates.И вот Ласточка пролетела над великим городом и увидела, как богатые веселятся в своих красивых домах, в то время как нищие сидят у ворот.beggar - [ˈbegə] - нищий
gates - [geɪts] - ворота
He flew into dark lanes, and saw the white faces of starving children looking out listlessly at the black streets.Он влетел в темные переулки и увидел белые лица голодающих детей, вяло смотревших на черные улицы.lane - [leɪn] - переулок
starving - [ˈstɑːvɪŋ] - голодающий
listlessly - [ˈlɪstlɪslɪ] - вяло
Under the archway of a bridge two little boys were lying in one another's arms to try and keep themselves warm.Под аркой моста два маленьких мальчика лежали в объятиях друг друга, пытаясь согреться.archway - [ˈɑːʧweɪ] - арка
"How hungry we are!" they said."Как мы голодны!" - сказали они.
"You must not lie here," shouted the Watchman, and they wandered out into the rain."Вы не должны здесь лежать", - крикнул Сторож, и они пошли бродить и под дождь.Watchman - [ˈwɒʧmən] - Сторож
Then he flew back and told the Prince what he had seen.Затем он полетел обратно и рассказал принцу о том, что видел.
"I am covered with fine gold," said the Prince, "you must take it off, leaf by leaf, and give it to my poor; the living always think that goldcan make them happy.""Я покрыт чистым золотом, - сказал принц, - ты должен снять его, лист за листом, и отдать моим бедным; живые всегда думают, что золото может сделать их счастливыми".leaf - [liːf] - лист
Leaf after leaf of the fine gold the Swallow picked off, till the Happy Prince looked quite dull and grey.Лист за листом чистого золота срывала Ласточка, пока Счастливый Принц не стал совсем тусклым и серым.dull - [dʌl] - тусклый скучный
Leaf after leaf of the fine gold he brought the the poor, and the children's faces grew rosier, and they laughed and played games in the street.Лист за листом чистого золота он приносил бедным, и лица детей становились все розовее, и они смеялись и играли в игры на улице.
"We have bread now!" they cried."Теперь у нас есть хлеб!" - кричали они.
Then the snow came, and after the snow came the frost.Потом пошел снег, а за снегом пришел мороз.frost - [frɒst] - мороз
The streets looked as if they were made of silver, they were so bright and glistening; long icicles like crystal daggers hung down from the eaves of the houses, everybody went about in furs, and the little boys wore scarlet caps and skated on the ice.Улицы выглядели так, словно были сделаны из серебра, они были такими яркими и блестящими; длинные сосульки, похожие на хрустальные кинжалы, свисали с карнизов домов, все ходили в мехах, а маленькие мальчики носили алые шапочки и катались на коньках по льду.glistening - [ˈglɪsnɪŋ] - сверкающий
icicles - [ˈaɪsɪkl] - сосулька
crystal - [krɪstl] - кристалл хрусталь
dagger - [ˈdægə] - кинжал
eaves - [iːvz] - карнизы свесы крыш
furs - [fɜːz] - меховые изделия
cap - [kæp] - шапка
skate - [skeɪt] - кататься на коньках
The poor little Swallow grew colder and colder, but he would not leave the Prince, he loved him too well.Бедной маленькой Ласточке становилось все холоднее и холоднее, но он не хотел оставлять принца, он слишком сильно любил его.
He picked up crumbs outside the baker's door when the baker was not looking and tried to keep himself warm by flapping his wings.Он подбирал крошки за дверью пекарни, когда пекарь не смотрел, и пытался согреться, хлопая крыльями.crumbs - [krʌmz] - крошки
baker - [ˈbeɪkə] - пекарь булочная
flap - [flæp] - хлопать
But at last he knew that he was going to die.Но наконец он понял, что умрет.
He had just strength to fly up to the Prince's shoulder once more.У него хватило сил только на то, чтобы еще раз взлететь на плечо принца.strength - [streŋθ] - сила
"Goodbye, dear Prince!" he murmured "will you let me kiss your hand?""Прощай, дорогой принц!" - прошептал он. - "Ты позволишь мне поцеловать твою руку?"murmur - [ˈmɜːmə] - шептать пробормотать
"I am glad that you are going to Egypt at last, little Swallow," said the Prince "you have stayed too long here; but you must kiss me on the lips, for I love you.""Я рад, что ты наконец-то едешь в Египет, маленькая Ласточка, - сказал принц. - Ты пробыла здесь слишком долго, но ты должна поцеловать меня в губы, потому что я люблю тебя".
"It is not to Egypt that I am going," said the Swallow."Я еду не в Египет", - сказала Ласточка.
"I am going to the House of Death."Я иду в Дом Смерти.
Death is the brother of Sleep, is he not?"Смерть - брат Сна, не так ли?"
And he kissed the Happy Prince on the lips, and fell down dead at his feet.И он поцеловал Счастливого принца в губы и упал замертво к его ногам.
At that moment a curious crack sounded inside the statue, as if something had broken.В этот момент внутри статуи раздался странный треск, как будто что-то сломалось.crack - [kræk] - треск трещина
The fact is that the leaden heart had snapped right in two.Дело в том, что свинцовое сердце разорвалось прямо надвое.leaden - [ledn] - свинцовый
snap - [snæp] - щелкать сломаться
It certainly was a dreadfully hard frost.Это, конечно, был ужасно сильный мороз.
Early the next morning the Mayor was walking in the square below in company with the Town Councillors.Ранним утром следующего дня мэр прогуливался по площади внизу в компании членов городского совета.
As they passed the column he looked up at the statue: "Dear me!Когда они проходили мимо колонны, он поднял глаза на статую: "Боже мой!
How shabby the Happy Prince looks!" he said.Как убого выглядит Счастливый принц!" - сказал он.
"How shabby indeed!" cried the Town Councillors, who always agreed with the Mayor, and they went up to look at it."Действительно, как убого!" - воскликнули члены городского совета, которые всегда соглашались с мэром, и поднялись, чтобы посмотреть на это.
"The ruby has fallen out of his sword, his eyes are gone, and he is golden no longer," said the Mayor "in fact, he is little better than a beggar!""Рубин выпал из его меча, его глаза исчезли, и он больше не золотой", - сказал мэр. "На самом деле, он немногим лучше нищего!"
"Little better than a beggar," said the Town Councillors."Немногим лучше нищего", - сказали члены городского совета.
"And here is actually a dead bird at his feet!" continued the Mayor."А вот и на самом деле мертвая птица у его ног!" - продолжил мэр.
"We must really issue a proclamation that birds are not to be allowed to die here.""Мы действительно должны издать прокламацию о том, что птицам нельзя позволять здесь умирать".issue - [ˈɪʃuː] - издавать выпускать выдавать
proclamation - [prɒkləˈmeɪʃn] - провозглашение объявление декларация
And the Town Clerk made a note of the suggestion.И городской клерк записал это предложение.suggestion - [səˈʤesʧən] - предложение
So they pulled down the statue of the Happy Prince.Поэтому они снесли статую Счастливого принца.pul - [pʊl] - вытягивать выдергивать
"As he is no longer beautiful he is no longer useful," said the Art Professor at the University."Поскольку он больше не красив, он больше не полезен", - сказал профессор искусств в университете.
Then they melted the statue in a furnace, and the Mayor held a meeting of the Corporation to decide what was to be done with the metal.Затем они расплавили статую в печи, и мэр провел собрание Корпорации, чтобы решить, что делать с металлом.melt - [melt] - плавить
furnace - [ˈfɜːnɪs] - печь
"We must have another statue, of course," he said."Конечно, нам нужна еще одна статуя", - сказал он.
"and it shall be a statue of myself.""и это будет моя статуя".
"Of myself," said each of the Town Councillors, and they quarrelled."Моя", - сказал каждый из членов городского совета, и они поссорились.quarrel - [ˈkwɒrəl] - ссора
When I last heard of them they were quarrelling still.Когда я в последний раз слышал о них, они все еще ссорились.
"What a strange thing!" said the overseer of the workmen at the foundry."Какая странная вещь!" - сказал надсмотрщик над рабочими на литейном заводе.overseer - [ˈəʊvəsɪə] - надзиратель
foundry - [ˈfaʊndrɪ] - литейный завод
"This broken lead heart will not melt in the furnace."Это разбитое свинцовое сердце не расплавится в печи.
We must throw it away."Мы должны выбросить его".
So they threw it on a dust heap where the dead Swallow was also lying.И так они бросили его на кучу пыли, где тоже лежала мертвая Ласточка.dust - [dʌst] - пыль прах мусор
heap - [hiːp] - куча
"Bring me the two most precious things in the city," said God to one of His Angels; and the Angel brought Him the leaden heart and the dead bird."Принеси мне две самые драгоценные вещи в городе", - сказал Бог одному из Своих Ангелов, и Ангел принес Ему свинцовое сердце и мертвую птицу.precious - [ˈpreʃəs] - драгоценный
"You have rightly chosen," said God, "for in my garden of Paradise this little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince shall praise me.""Ты правильно выбрал, - сказал Бог, - ибо в моем Райском саду эта маленькая птичка будет петь вечно, и в моем золотом городе Счастливый принц будет восхвалять меня".evermore - [evəˈmɔː] - вечно
praise - [preɪz] - хвалить

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