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The Velveteen Rabbit

There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid. He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen. On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy’s stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming.

There were other things in the stocking, nuts and oranges and a toy engine, and chocolate almonds and a clockwork mouse, but the Rabbit was quite the best of all. For at least two hours the Boy loved him, and then Aunts and Uncles came to dinner, and there was a great rustling of tissue paper and unwrapping of parcels, and in the excitement of looking at all the new presents the Velveteen Rabbit was forgotten.

For a long time he lived in the toy cupboard or on the nursery floor, and no one thought very much about him. He was naturally shy, and being only made of velveteen, some of the more expensive toys quite snubbed him. The mechanical toys were very superior, and looked down upon every one else; they were full of modern ideas, and pretended they were real. The model boat, who had lived through two seasons and lost most of his paint, caught the tone from them and never missed an opportunity of referring to his rigging in technical terms. The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles. Even Timothy, the jointed wooden lion, who was made by the disabled soldiers, and should have had broader views, put on airs and pretended he was connected with Government. Between them all the poor little Rabbit was made to feel himself very insignificant and commonplace, and the only person who was kind to him at all was the Skin Horse.

The Skin Horse had lived longer in the nursery than any of the others. He was so old that his brown coat was bald in patches and showed the seams underneath, and most of the hairs in his tail had been pulled out to string bead necklaces. He was wise, for he had seen a long succession of mechanical toys arrive to boast and swagger, and by-and-by break their mainsprings and pass away, and he knew that they were only toys, and would never turn into anything else. For nursery magic is very strange and wonderful, and only those playthings that are old and wise and experienced like the Skin Horse understand all about it.

"What is REAL?" asked the Rabbit one day, when they were lying side by side near the nursery fender, before Nana came to tidy the room. "Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?"

"Real isn't how you are made," said the Skin Horse. "It's a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real."

"Does it hurt?" asked the Rabbit.

"Sometimes," said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. "When you are Real you don't mind being hurt."

"Does it happen all at once, like being wound up," he asked, "or bit by bit?"

"It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse. "You become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't often happen to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand."

"I suppose you are Real?" said the Rabbit. And then he wished he had not said it, for he thought the Skin Horse might be sensitive. But the Skin Horse only smiled.

"The Boy's Uncle made me Real," he said. "That was a great many years ago; but once you are Real you can't become unreal again. It lasts for always."

The Rabbit sighed. He thought it would be a long time before this magic called Real happened to him. He longed to become Real, to know what it felt like; and yet the idea of growing shabby and losing his eyes and whiskers was rather sad. He wished that he could become it without these uncomfortable things happening to him.

There was a person called Nana who ruled the nursery. Sometimes she took no notice of the playthings lying about, and sometimes, for no reason whatever, she went swooping about like a great wind and hustled them away in cupboards. She called this "tidying up," and the playthings all hated it, especially the tin ones. The Rabbit didn't mind it so much, for wherever he was thrown he came down soft.

One evening, when the Boy was going to bed, he couldn't find the china dog that always slept with him. Nana was in a hurry, and it was too much trouble to hunt for china dogs at bedtime, so she simply looked about her, and seeing that the toy cupboard door stood open, she made a swoop.

"Here," she said, "take your old Bunny! He'll do to sleep with you!" And she dragged the Rabbit out by one ear, and put him into the Boy's arms.

That night, and for many nights after, the Velveteen Rabbit slept in the Boy’s bed. At first he found it rather uncomfortable, for the Boy hugged him very tight, and sometimes he rolled over on him, and sometimes he pushed him so far under the pillow that the Rabbit could scarcely breathe. And he missed, too, those long moonlight hours in the nursery, when all the house was silent, and his talks with the Skin Horse. But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the burrows the real rabbits lived in. And they had splendid games together, in whispers, when Nana had gone away to her supper and left the nightlight burning on the mantelpiece. And when the Boy dropped off to sleep, the Rabbit would snuggle down close under his little warm chin and dream, with the Boy's hands clasped close round him all night long.

And so time went on, and the little Rabbit was very happy—so happy that he never noticed how his beautiful velveteen fur was getting shabbier and shabbier, and his tail coming unsewn, and all the pink rubbed off his nose where the Boy had kissed him.

Spring came, and they had long days in the garden, for wherever the Boy went the Rabbit went too. He had rides in the wheelbarrow, and picnics on the grass, and lovely fairy huts built for him under the raspberry canes behind the flower border. And once, when the Boy was called away suddenly to go out to tea, the Rabbit was left out on the lawn until long after dusk, and Nana had to come and look for him with the candle because the Boy couldn’t go to sleep unless he was there. He was wet through with the dew and quite earthy from diving into the burrows the Boy had made for him in the flower bed, and Nana grumbled as she rubbed him off with a corner of her apron.

"You must have your old Bunny!" she said. "Fancy all that fuss for a toy!"

The Boy sat up in bed and stretched out his hands.

"Give me my Bunny!" he said. "You mustn't say that. He isn’t a toy. He’s REAL!"

When the little Rabbit heard that he was happy, for he knew that what the Skin Horse had said was true at last. The nursery magic had happened to him, and he was a toy no longer. He was Real. The Boy himself had said it.

That night he was almost too happy to sleep, and so much love stirred in his little sawdust heart that it almost burst. And into his boot-button eyes, that had long ago lost their polish, there came a look of wisdom and beauty, so that even Nana noticed it next morning when she picked him up, and said, "I declare if that old Bunny hasn't got quite a knowing expression!"

That was a wonderful Summer!

Near the house where they lived there was a wood, and in the long June evenings the Boy liked to go there after tea to play. He took the Velveteen Rabbit with him, and before he wandered off to pick flowers, or play at brigands among the trees, he always made the Rabbit a little nest somewhere among the bracken, where he would be quite cosy, for he was a kind-hearted little boy and he liked Bunny to be comfortable. One evening, while the Rabbit was lying there alone, watching the ants that ran to and fro between his velvet paws in the grass, he saw two strange beings creep out of the tall bracken near him.

They were rabbits like himself, but quite furry and brand-new. They must have been very well made, for their seams didn't show at all, and they changed shape in a queer way when they moved; one minute they were long and thin and the next minute fat and bunchy, instead of always staying the same like he did. Their feet padded softly on the ground, and they crept quite close to him, twitching their noses, while the Rabbit stared hard to see which side the clockwork stuck out, for he knew that people who jump generally have something to wind them up. But he couldn't see it. They were evidently a new kind of rabbit altogether.

They stared at him, and the little Rabbit stared back. And all the time their noses twitched.

"Why don't you get up and play with us?" one of them asked.

"I don't feel like it," said the Rabbit, for he didn't want to explain that he had no clockwork.

"Ho!" said the furry rabbit. "It's as easy as anything." And he gave a big hop sideways and stood on his hind legs.

"I don't believe you can!" he said.

"I can!" said the little Rabbit. "I can jump higher than anything!" He meant when the Boy threw him, but of course he didn't want to say so.

"Can you hop on your hind legs?" asked the furry rabbit.

That was a dreadful question, for the Velveteen Rabbit had no hind legs at all! The back of him was made all in one piece, like a pincushion. He sat still in the bracken, and hoped that the other rabbits wouldn't notice.

"I don't want to!" he said again.

But the wild rabbits have very sharp eyes. And this one stretched out his neck and looked.

"He hasn't got any hind legs!" he called out. "Fancy a rabbit without any hind legs!" And he began to laugh.

"I have!" cried the little Rabbit. "I have got hind legs! I am sitting on them!"

"Then stretch them out and show me, like this!" said the wild rabbit. And he began to whirl round and dance, till the little Rabbit got quite dizzy.

"I don't like dancing," he said. "I'd rather sit still!"

But all the while he was longing to dance, for a funny new tickly feeling ran through him, and he felt he would give anything in the world to be able to jump about like these rabbits did.

The strange rabbit stopped dancing, and came quite close. He came so close this time that his long whiskers brushed the Velveteen Rabbit's ear, and then he wrinkled his nose suddenly and flattened his ears and jumped backwards.

"He doesn’t smell right!" he exclaimed. "He isn’t a rabbit at all! He isn’t real!"

"I am Real!" said the little Rabbit, "I am Real! The Boy said so!" And he nearly began to cry.

Just then there was a sound of footsteps, and the Boy ran past near them, and with a stamp of feet and a flash of white tails the two strange rabbits disappeared.

"Come back and play with me!" called the little Rabbit. "Oh, do came back! I know I am Real!"

But there was no answer, only the little ants ran to and fro, and the bracken swayed gently where the two strangers had passed. The Velveteen Rabbit was all alone.

"Oh, dear!" he thought. "Why did they run away like that? Why couldn't they stop and talk to me?" For a long time he lay very still, watching the bracken, and hoping that they would come back. But they never returned, and presently the sun sank lower and the little white moths fluttered out, and the Boy came and carried him home.

Weeks passed, and the little Rabbit grew very old and shabby, but the Boy loved him just as much. He loved him so hard that he loved all his whiskers off, and the pink lining to his ears turned grey, and his brown spots faded. He even began to lose his shape, and he scarcely looked like a rabbit any more, except to the Boy. To him he was always beautiful, and that was all that the little Rabbit cared about. He didn’t mind how he looked to other people, because the nursery magic had made him Real, and when you are Real shabbiness doesn't matter.

And then, one day, the Boy was ill.

His face grew very flushed, and he talked in his sleep, and his little body was so hot that it burned the Rabbit when he held him close. Strange people came and went in the nursery, and a light burned all night, and through it all the little Velveteen Rabbit lay there, hidden from sight under the bedclothes, and he never stirred, for he The Velveteen Rabbit loves the boy and waits patiently for himwas afraid that if they found him some one might take him away, and he knew that the Boy needed him.

It was a long weary time, for the Boy was too ill to play, and the little Rabbit found it rather dull with nothing to do all day long. But he snuggled down patiently, and looked forward to the time when the Boy should be well again, and they would go out in the garden amongst the flowers and the butterflies and play splendid games in the raspberry thicket like they used to. All sorts of delightful things he planned, and while the Boy lay half asleep he crept up close to the pillow and whispered them in his ear. And presently the fever turned, and the Boy got better. He was able to sit up in bed and look at picture books, while the little Rabbit cuddled close at his side. And one day, they let him get up and dress.

It was a bright, sunny morning, and the windows stood wide open. They had carried the Boy out on to the balcony, wrapped in a shawl, and the little Rabbit lay tangled up among the bedclothes, thinking.

The Boy was going to the seaside to-morrow. Everything was arranged, and now it only remained to carry out the doctor's orders. They talked about it all, while the little Rabbit lay under the bedclothes, with just his head peeping out, and listened. The room was to be disinfected, and all the books and toys that the Boy had played with in bed must be burnt.

"Hurrah!" thought the little Rabbit. "To-morrow we shall go to the seaside!" For the Boy had often talked of the seaside, and he wanted very much to see the big waves coming in, and the tiny crabs, and the sand castles.

Just then Nana caught sight of him.

"How about his old Bunny?" she asked.

"That?" said the doctor. "Why, it’s a mass of scarlet fever germs!—Burn it at once. What? Nonsense! Get him a new one. He mustn’t have that any more!"

And so the little Rabbit was put into a sack with the old picture-books and a lot of rubbish, and carried out to the end of the garden behind the fowl-house. That was a fine place to make a bonfire, only the gardener was too busy just then to attend to it. He had the potatoes to dig and the green peas to gather, but next morning he promised to come quite early and burn the whole lot.

That night the Boy slept in a different bedroom, and he had a new bunny to sleep with him. It was a splendid bunny, all white plush with real glass eyes, but the Boy was too excited to care very much about it. For to-morrow he was going to the seaside, and that in itself was such a wonderful thing that he could think of nothing else.

And while the Boy was asleep, dreaming of the seaside, the little Rabbit lay among the old picture-books in the corner behind the fowlhouse, and he felt very lonely. The sack had been left untied, and so by wriggling a bit he was able to get his head through the opening and look out. He was shivering a little, for he had always been used to sleeping in a proper bed, and by this time his coat had worn so thin and threadbare from hugging that it was no longer any protection to him. Near by he could see the thicket of raspberry canes, growing tall and close like a tropical jungle, in whose shadow he had played with the Boy on bygone mornings. He thought of those long sunlit hours in the garden—how happy they were—and a great sadness came over him. He seemed to see them all pass before him, each more beautiful than the other, the fairy huts in the flower-bed, the quiet evenings in the wood when he lay in the bracken and the little ants ran over his paws; the wonderful day when he first knew that he was Real. He thought of the Skin Horse, so wise and gentle, and all that he had told him. Of what use was it to be loved and lose one’s beauty and become Real if it all ended like this? And a tear, a real tear, trickled down his little shabby velvet nose and fell to the ground.

And then a strange thing happened. For where the tear had fallen a flower grew out of the ground, a mysterious flower, not at all like any that grew in the garden. It had slender green leaves the colour of emeralds, and in the centre of the leaves a blossom like a golden cup. It was so beautiful that the little Rabbit forgot to cry, and just lay there watching it. And presently the blossom opened, and out of it there stepped a fairy.

She was quite the loveliest fairy in the whole world. Her dress was of pearl and dewdrops, and there were flowers round her neck and in her hair, and her face was like the most perfect flower of all. And she came close to the little Rabbit and gathered him up in her arms and kissed him on his velveteen nose that was all damp from crying.

"Little Rabbit," she said, "don't you know who I am?"

The Rabbit looked up at her, and it seemed to him that he had seen her face before, but he couldn't think where.

"I am the nursery magic Fairy," she said. "I take care of all the playthings that the children have loved. When they are old and worn out and the children don't need them any more, then I come and take them away with me and turn them into Real."

"Wasn't I Real before?" asked the little Rabbit.

"You were Real to the Boy," the Fairy said, "because he loved you. Now you shall be real to every one."

And she held the little Rabbit close in her arms and flew with him into the wood.

It was light now, for the moon had risen. All the forest was beautiful, and the fronds of the bracken shone like frosted silver. In the open glade between the tree-trunks the wild rabbits danced with their shadows on the velvet grass, but when they saw the Fairy they all stopped dancing and stood round in a ring to stare at her.

"I’ve brought you a new playfellow," the Fairy said. "You must be very kind to him and teach him all he needs to know in Rabbitland, for he is going to live with you for ever and ever!"

And she kissed the little Rabbit again and put him down on the grass.

"Run and play, little Rabbit!" she said.

But the little Rabbit sat quite still for a moment and never moved. For when he saw all the wild rabbits dancing around him he suddenly remembered about his hind legs, and he didn’t want them to see that he was made all in one piece. He did not know that when the Fairy kissed him that last time she had changed him altogether. And he might have sat there a long time, too shy to move, if just then something hadn't tickled his nose, and before he thought what he was doing he lifted his hind toe to scratch it.

And he found that he actually had hind legs! Instead of dingy velveteen he had brown fur, soft and shiny, his ears twitched by themselves, and his whiskers were so long that they brushed the grass. He gave one leap and the joy of using those hind legs was so great that he went springing about the turf on them, jumping sideways and whirling round as the others did, and he grew so excited that when at last he did stop to look for the Fairy she had gone.

He was a Real Rabbit at last, at home with the other rabbits.

Autumn passed and Winter, and in the Spring, when the days grew warm and sunny, the Boy went out to play in the wood behind the house. And while he was playing, two rabbits crept out from the bracken and peeped at him. One of them was brown all over, but the other had strange markings under his fur, as though long ago he had been spotted, and the spots still showed through. And about his little soft nose and his round black eyes there was something familiar, so that the Boy thought to himself:

"Why, he looks just like my old Bunny that was lost when I had scarlet fever!"

But he never knew that it really was his own Bunny, come back to look at the child who had first helped him to be Real.

Таблица для изучения текста.

There was once a velveteen rabbit, and in the beginning he was really splendid.Жил-был один вельветовый кролик, и поначалу он был просто великолепен.splendid - [ˈsplendɪd] - великолепный
He was fat and bunchy, as a rabbit should be; his coat was spotted brown and white, he had real thread whiskers, and his ears were lined with pink sateen.Он был толстый и пухлый, как и положено кролику; его шерсть была в коричневых и белых пятнах, у него были настоящие нитяные бакенбарды, а уши были подбиты розовым атласом.bunchy - [ˈbʌnʧɪ] - пухлый
coat - [kəʊt] - оболочка
spotted - [ˈspɒtɪd] - пятнистый
thread - [θred] - нить
whiskers - [ˈwɪskəz] - бакенбарды усы
lined - [laɪnd] - облицованный
sateen - [səˈtiːn] - сатин атлас
charming - [ˈʧɑːmɪŋ] - очаровательный
On Christmas morning, when he sat wedged in the top of the Boy’s stocking, with a sprig of holly between his paws, the effect was charming.Рождественским утром, когда он сидел, втиснувшись в чулок Мальчика, с веточкой остролиста между лапами, эффект был очаровательным.wedged - [weʤd] - зажатый втиснутый
stocking - [ˈstɒkɪŋ] - чулок
sprig - [sprɪg] - веточка
holly - [ˈhɔlɪ] - остролист
There were other things in the stocking, nuts and oranges and a toy engine, and chocolate almonds and a clockwork mouse, but the Rabbit was quite the best of all.В чулке были и другие вещи: орехи, апельсины, игрушечный двигатель, шоколадный миндаль и заводная мышь, но Кролик был самым лучшим из всех.nuts - [nʌts] - орехи
engine - [ˈenʤɪn] - двигатель
almonds - [ˈɑːməndz] - миндальные орехи
clockwork - [ˈklɒkwɜːk] - заводной
quite - [kwaɪt] - самый
For at least two hours the Boy loved him, and then Aunts and Uncles came to dinner, and there was a great rustling of tissue paper and unwrapping of parcels, and in the excitement of looking at all the new presents the Velveteen Rabbit was forgotten.По крайней мере два часа Мальчик любил его, а потом к обеду пришли тети и дяди, и раздался громкий шорох папиросной бумаги и разворачивание свертков, и в волнении от созерцания всех новых подарков Вельветовый Кролик был забыт.rustling - [ˈrʌslɪŋ] - шелест
tissue - [ˈtɪʃuː] - тканевый
unwrapping - ['unwrapping] - разворачивание
parcels - [pɑːslz] - посылки
excitement - [ɪkˈsaɪtmənt] - волнение
For a long time he lived in the toy cupboard or on the nursery floor, and no one thought very much about him.Долгое время он жил в шкафу с игрушками или на полу в детской, и никто о нем особо не думал.nursery - [ˈnɜːsərɪ] - детская
He was naturally shy, and being only made of velveteen, some of the more expensive toys quite snubbed him.Он был от природы застенчив, и, поскольку был сделан только из вельвета, некоторые из более дорогих игрушек довольно пренебрежительно относились к нему.naturally - [ˈnæʧrəlɪ] - от природы
shy - [ʃaɪ] - застенчивый
expensive - [ɪksˈpensɪv] - дорогой
quite - [kwaɪt] - довольно
snubbed - [snubbed] - относились пренебрежительно
The mechanical toys were very superior, and looked down upon every one else; they were full of modern ideas, and pretended they were real.Механические игрушки были очень превосходны и смотрели свысока на всех остальных; они были полны современных идей и притворялись, что они реальны.superior - [sjuːˈpɪərɪə] - превосходящий
upon - [əˈpɒn] - предлог на
else - [els] - остальные
pretended - [prɪˈtendɪd] - притворялись
The model boat, who had lived through two seasons and lost most of his paint, caught the tone from them and never missed an opportunity of referring to his rigging in technical terms.Модель лодки, которая пережила два сезона и потеряла большую часть своей краски, уловила их тон и никогда не упускала возможности обращения к его одежде в технических терминахboat - [bəʊt] - лодка
missed - [mɪst] - упустить
opportunity - [ɒpəˈtjuːnɪtɪ] - возможность
referring - [rɪˈfɜːrɪŋ] - обращение
rigging - [ˈrɪgɪŋ] - оснастка одежда
The Rabbit could not claim to be a model of anything, for he didn’t know that real rabbits existed; he thought they were all stuffed with sawdust like himself, and he understood that sawdust was quite out-of-date and should never be mentioned in modern circles.Кролик не мог претендовать на то, чтобы быть моделью чего-либо, потому что он не знал, что существуют настоящие кролики; он думал, что все они были набиты опилками, как и он сам, и он понимал, что опилки совершенно устарели и никогда не должны упоминаться в современных кругах.claim - [kleɪm] - претензия претендовать
exist - [ɪgˈzɪst] - существовать
stuffed - [stʌft] - набитый
sawdust - [ˈsɔːdʌst] - опилки
out-of-date - [aʊt ɒv deɪt] - устаревший
mentioned - [menʃnd] - упомянутый
Even Timothy, the jointed wooden lion, who was made by the disabled soldiers, and should have had broader views, put on airs and pretended he was connected with Government.Даже Тимоти, членистый деревянный лев, которого сделали солдаты-инвалиды и который должен был иметь более широкие взгляды, напускал на себя вид и притворялся, что связан с правительством.Even - [ˈiːvən] - даже
jointed - [ˈʤɔɪntɪd] - членистый
broader - [ˈbrɔːdər] - более широкий
Between them all the poor little Rabbit was made to feel himself very insignificant and commonplace, and the only person who was kind to him at all was the Skin Horse.Между ними всеми бедный маленький Кролик чувствовал себя очень незначительным и заурядным, и единственным человеком, который был добр к нему, была Кожаная Лошадь.poor - [pʊə] - бедный
insignificant - [ɪnsɪgˈnɪfɪkənt] - незначительный
commonplace - [ˈkɒmənpleɪs] - банальность заурядный
Skin - [skɪn] - кожа
He was so old that his brown coat was bald in patches and showed the seams underneath, and most of the hairs in his tail had been pulled out to string bead necklaces.Он был так стар, что его коричневое покрытие было лысым в пятнах и показывало швы под ним, а большая часть волос в его хвосте была вырвана, чтобы нанизывать бусы в ожерелья. bald - [bɔːld] - лысый
patches - [ˈpæʧɪz] - заплаты
seams - [seams] - швы
underneath - [ʌndəˈniːθ] - под
tail - [teɪl] - хвост
pull out - [pʊl aʊt] - вытаскивать вырывать
string - [strɪŋ] - нанизывать
bead - [biːd] - бусина
necklaces - [ˈneklɪs] - бусы ожерелья
He was wise, for he had seen a long succession of mechanical toys arrive to boast and swagger, and by-and-by break their mainsprings and pass away, and he knew that they were only toys, and would never turn into anything else.Он был мудр, потому что видел длинную череду механических игрушек, которые появлялись, чтобы хвастаться и хвастаться, и мало-помалу ломали свои пружины и уходили, и он знал, что они были всего лишь игрушками и никогда не превратятся ни во что другое.wise - [waɪz] - мудрый
succession - [səkˈseʃn] - последовательность
arrive - [əˈraɪv] - прибывать
boast - [bəʊst] - хвастовство
swagger - [ˈswægə] - развязность хорохориться
by-and-by - [baɪ-ænd-baɪ] - мало-помалу
mainsprings - [mainsprings] - главные движущие силы (пружины)
For nursery magic is very strange and wonderful, and only those playthings that are old and wise and experienced like the Skin Horse understand all about it.Ибо детская магия очень странна и удивительна, и только те игрушки, которые стары, мудры и опытны, как Кожаный Конь, понимают все об этом.strange - [streɪnʤ] - странный
experienced - [ɪksˈpɪərɪənst] - опытный
"What is REAL?" asked the Rabbit one day, when they were lying side by side near the nursery fender, before Nana came to tidy the room."Что такое НАСТОЯЩЕЕ?" - спросил Кролик однажды, когда они лежали бок о бок у камина в детской, прежде чем Нана пришла прибраться в комнате.lying - [ˈlaɪɪŋ] - лежащий
side - [saɪd] - бок
fender - [ˈfendə] - каминная решетка
tidy - [ˈtaɪdɪ] - приборка
"Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?""Означает ли это иметь вещи, которые жужжат внутри тебя, и выпирающую рукоять?"buzz - [bʌz] - жужжать гудеть
stick-out - [stɪk aʊt] - торчать высовываться выпирать
handle - [hændl] - ручка рукоятка
"Real isn't how you are made," said the Skin Horse.-Настоящий-это не то, как ты сделан, - сказал Кожаный Конь.
"It's a thing that happens to you."Это то, что происходит с тобой.
When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.Когда ребенок любит вас в течение долгого, долгого времени, не просто для того, чтобы играть с вами, но ДЕЙСТВИТЕЛЬНО любит вас, тогда вы становитесь Настоящими.
"Does it hurt?" asked the Rabbit.-Это больно?- спросил Кролик.hurt - [hɜːt] - боль страдать
"Sometimes," said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful.- Иногда, - ответил Кожаный Конь, потому что он всегда был правдив.truthful - [ˈtruːθf(ə)l] - правдивый искренний
"When you are Real you don't mind being hurt.- Когда ты Настоящий, ты не боишься, что тебе причинят боль.mind - [maɪnd] - ум мысль (думать) возражать
"Does it happen all at once, like being wound up," he asked, "or bit by bit?" - Это происходит все сразу, как будто тебя заводят, - спросил он, -или постепенно?" wound up - [wuːnd ʌp] - заведенный
"It doesn't happen all at once," said the Skin Horse.- Это происходит не сразу, - сказал Кожаный Конь.
"You become.Вы оказываетесь.become - [bɪˈkʌm] - оказываться
It takes a long time.Это занимает много времени.
That's why it doesn't often happen to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept.Вот почему это не часто случается с людьми, которые легко ломаются, или имеют острые края, или которых нужно бережно хранить.sharp - [ʃɑːp] - острый
edges - [ˈeʤɪz] - края
kept - [kept] - держал хранил
Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby.Как правило, к тому времени, когда вы становитесь Настоящими, большая часть ваших волос уже сорвана, ваши глаза выпадают, и вы становитесь рыхлыми в суставах и очень потрепанными.Generally - [ˈʤenərəlɪ] - обычно как правило
drop out - [drɒp aʊt] - выпадать
loose - [luːs] - рыхлый не затянутый
joints - [joints] - суставы
shabby - [ˈʃæbɪ] - потертый обшарпанный
But these things don't matter at all, because once you are Real you can't be ugly, except to people who don't understand.Но все это не имеет никакого значения, потому что, как только вы станете Настоящими, вы не сможете быть уродливыми, кроме как для людей, которые не понимают.matter - [ˈmætə] - значить иметь значение
except - [ɪkˈsept] - кроме
"I suppose you are Real?" said the Rabbit.-Я полагаю, ты Настоящий? - спросил Кролик.suppose - [səˈpəʊz] - предполагать
And then he wished he had not said it, for he thought the Skin Horse might be sensitive.А потом он пожалел, что сказал это, потому что подумал, что Кожанный Конь может быть чувствительной.wished - [wɪʃt] - пожелал
might - [maɪt] - вероятно может быть
sensitive - [ˈsensɪtɪv] - чувствительный
But the Skin Horse only smiled.Но Кожанный Конь только улыбнулся.
"The Boy's Uncle made me Real," he said.- Дядя Мальчика сделал меня Настоящим,- сказал он.
"That was a great many years ago; but once you are Real you can't become unreal again.- Это было очень много лет назад, но как только ты станешь Настоящим, ты уже не сможешь снова стать нереальным.
It lasts for always.Это длится вечно.
The Rabbit sighed.Кролик вздохнул.sighed - [sighed] - вздохнул
He thought it would be a long time before this magic called Real happened to him.Он думал, что пройдет много времени, прежде чем с ним случится это волшебство, называемое Реальным.
He longed to become Real, to know what it felt like; and yet the idea of growing shabby and losing his eyes and whiskers was rather sad.Он жаждал стать Настоящим, узнать, каково это; и все же мысль о том, что он станет потрепанным и потеряет глаза и бакенбарды, была довольно печальной.longed - [ˈlɒŋd] - жаждал
felt - [felt] - почувствовал
yet - [jet] - однако все же
rather - [ˈrɑːðə] - достаточно довольно
sad - [sæd] - грустный
He wished that he could become it without these uncomfortable things happening to him.Он хотел бы стать таким без того, чтобы с ним случались эти неприятные вещи.uncomfortable - [ʌnˈkʌmf(ə)təb(ə)l] - неудобный дискомфортный
There was a person called Nana who ruled the nursery.Была одна особа по имени Нана, которая управляла детской.
Sometimes she took no notice of the playthings lying about, and sometimes, for no reason whatever, she went swooping about like a great wind and hustled them away in cupboards.Иногда она не обращала внимания на разбросанные повсюду игрушки, а иногда, без всякой причины, налетала, как сильный ветер, и уносила их прочь в шкафы.take notice of - [teɪk ˈnəʊtɪs ɒv] - обращать внимание на
reason - [riːzn] - причина
whatever - [wɒtˈevə] - что угодно
swooping - [swooping] - налетая пикируя
hustle - [hʌsl] - спешить суетиться суета
She called this "tidying up," and the playthings all hated it, especially the tin ones.Она называла это "уборкой", и все игрушки ненавидели это, особенно жестяные.especially - [ɪsˈpeʃəlɪ] - особенно
tin - [tɪn] - оловянный консервный жестяной
The Rabbit didn't mind it so much, for wherever he was thrown he came down soft.Кролик не очень возражал, потому что, куда бы его ни бросили, он падал мягко.wherever - [we(ə)ˈrevə] - куда бы
thrown - [θrəʊn] - брошенный
soft - [sɒft] - мягкий нежный
One evening, when the Boy was going to bed, he couldn't find the china dog that always slept with him.Однажды вечером, когда Мальчик ложился спать, он не смог найти фарфоровую собачку, которая всегда спала с ним.china - [ˈʧaɪnə] - Китай фарфор
Nana was in a hurry, and it was too much trouble to hunt for china dogs at bedtime, so she simply looked about her, and seeing that the toy cupboard door stood open, she made a swoop.Нана торопилась, а охотиться на фарфоровых собачек перед сном было слишком хлопотно, поэтому она просто огляделась и, увидев, что дверца шкафа с игрушками открыта, сделала рывок.hurry - [ˈhʌrɪ] - спешка торопиться
too - [tuː] - тоже слишком
trouble - [trʌbl] - проблемный
stood - [stʊd] - стоял
swoop - [swuːp] - налетать пикировать
"Here," she said, "take your old Bunny! He'll do to sleep with you!" And she dragged the Rabbit out by one ear, and put him into the Boy's arms.-Вот,- сказала она, - возьми своего старого Кролика! Он согласится спать с тобой!" И она вытащила Кролика за ухо и положила его на руки Мальчику.Bunny - [ˈbʌnɪ] - кролик зайчик зайка
dragged - [drægd] - вытащила
That night, and for many nights after, the Velveteen Rabbit slept in the Boy’s bed.В ту ночь и еще много ночей после этого Вельветовый Кролик спал в постели Мальчика.
At first he found it rather uncomfortable, for the Boy hugged him very tight, and sometimes he rolled over on him, and sometimes he pushed him so far under the pillow that the Rabbit could scarcely breathe.Поначалу ему было довольно неудобно, потому что Мальчик очень крепко обнимал его, и иногда он переворачивался на него, а иногда так глубоко запихивал его под подушку, что Кролик едва мог дышать.hugged - [hugged] - обнимал
tight - [taɪt] - плотно тесно крепко
rolled - [rəʊld] - переворачивался
pushed - [pʊʃt] - заталкивал запихивал
scarcely - [ˈskeəslɪ] - едва ли с трудом
And he missed, too, those long moonlight hours in the nursery, when all the house was silent, and his talks with the Skin Horse.И еще он скучал по тем долгим лунным часам в детской, когда весь дом был погружен в тишину, и по своим разговорам с Кожаной Лошадью.missed - [mɪst] - скучал
But very soon he grew to like it, for the Boy used to talk to him, and made nice tunnels for him under the bedclothes that he said were like the burrows the real rabbits lived in.Но очень скоро ему это понравилось, потому что Мальчик часто разговаривал с ним и делал для него хорошие туннели под одеялом, которые, по его словам, были похожи на норы, в которых жили настоящие кролики.soon - [suːn] - скоро
grew to like it - [] - стало нравиться
used to - [juːzd tuː] - привыкший
bedclothes - [ˈbedkləʊðz] - постельное белье
burrows - [ˈbʌrəʊz] - норы
And they had splendid games together, in whispers, when Nana had gone away to her supper and left the nightlight burning on the mantelpiece.И они великолепно играли вместе, шепотом, когда Нана ушла ужинать и оставила ночник гореть на каминной полке.in whispers - [ɪn ˈwɪspəz] - шепотом
left - [left] - оставляя
burning - [ˈbɜːnɪŋ] - горение
mantelpiece - [ˈmæntlpiːs] - каминная полка
And when the Boy dropped off to sleep, the Rabbit would snuggle down close under his little warm chin and dream, with the Boy's hands clasped close round him all night long.И когда Мальчик засыпал, Кролик прижимался к его маленькому теплому подбородку и мечтал, а руки Мальчика крепко обнимали его всю ночь напролет.dropped off to sleep - [drɒpt ɒf] - засыпал
snuggle down - [snʌgl daʊn] - прижиматься
close under - [kləʊs ˈʌndə] - близко под
clasped - [klɑːspt] - обхватил
close - [kləʊs] - тесно вплотную
And so time went on, and the little Rabbit was very happy—so happy that he never noticed how his beautiful velveteen fur was getting shabbier and shabbier, and his tail coming unsewn, and all the pink rubbed off his nose where the Boy had kissed him.И так шло время, и маленький Кролик был очень счастлив—так счастлив, что никогда не замечал, как его прекрасный бархатный мех становился все более и более потрепанным, и его хвост распушился, и все розовое стерлось с его носа, где Мальчик поцеловал его.notice - [ˈnəʊtɪs] - замечать
fur - [fɜː] - мех шуба шерсть
unsewn - [ʌnˈsəʊn] - не сшитый распушенный
rubbed - [rʌbd] - натертый протертый
Spring came, and they had long days in the garden, for wherever the Boy went the Rabbit went too.Пришла весна, и они проводили долгие дни в саду, потому что, куда бы ни пошел Мальчик, Кролик тоже шел.
He had rides in the wheelbarrow, and picnics on the grass, and lovely fairy huts built for him under the raspberry canes behind the flower border.Он катался на тачке, устраивал пикники на траве и строил для него прекрасные сказочные хижины под малиновыми тростниками за цветочным бордюром.wheelbarrow - [ˈwiːlbærəʊ] - тачка тележка
grass - [grɑːs] - трава зелень
fairy - [ˈfe(ə)rɪ] - сказочный волшебный
huts - [huts] - домик избушка
raspberry - [ˈrɑːzbərɪ] - малина
cane - [keɪn] - тростник трость
behind - [bɪˈhaɪnd] - позади
And once, when the Boy was called away suddenly to go out to tea, the Rabbit was left out on the lawn until long after dusk, and Nana had to come and look for him with the candle because the Boy couldn’t go to sleep unless he was there.А однажды, когда Мальчика внезапно позвали на чай, Кролика оставили на лужайке до наступления сумерек, и Нане пришлось прийти и поискать его со свечой, потому что Мальчик не мог заснуть, если его не было рядом.suddenly - [ˈsʌdnlɪ] - внезапно вдруг неожиданно
lawn - [lɔːn] - лужайка газон
dusk - [dʌsk] - сумерки
candle - [kændl] - свеча
unless - [ənˈles] - если не
He was wet through with the dew and quite earthy from diving into the burrows the Boy had made for him in the flower bed, and Nana grumbled as she rubbed him off with a corner of her apron.Он был насквозь мокрым от росы и довольно грязным после ныряния в норы, которые Мальчик сделал для него на клумбе, и Нана ворчала, вытирая его уголком своего фартука.wet - [wet] - мокрый
dew - [djuː] - роса
earthy - [ˈɜːθɪ] - земляной в земле
flower bed - [ˈflaʊə bed] - цветочная клумба
grumbled - [grumbled] - ворчала
rub - [rʌb] - тереть
apron - [ˈeɪprən] - фартук
"You must have your old Bunny!" she said.-У тебя должен быть твой старый кролик! - сказала она.
"Fancy all that fuss for a toy!" - Подумать только, вся эта суета из-за игрушки!" Fancy all - [ˈfænsɪ ɔːl] - подумать только
fuss - [fʌs] - суета
The Boy sat up in bed and stretched out his hands.Мальчик сел в постели и протянул руки.stretched out - [streʧt aʊt] - протянул
"Give me my Bunny!" he said.-Дай мне моего Кролика! - сказал он.
"You mustn't say that.- Вы не должны так говорить.
He isn’t a toy.Он не игрушка.
He’s REAL!Он настоящий
When the little Rabbit heard that he was happy, for he knew that what the Skin Horse had said was true at last.Когда маленький Кролик услышал это, он был счастлив, потому что знал, что то, что сказала Кожаная Лошадь, наконец-то было правдой.
The nursery magic had happened to him, and he was a toy no longer.Детская магия случилась с ним, и он больше не был игрушкой.
He was Real.Он был Настоящим.
The Boy himself had said it.Это сказал сам Мальчик.
That night he was almost too happy to sleep, and so much love stirred in his little sawdust heart that it almost burst.В ту ночь он был слишком счастлив, чтобы заснуть, и в его маленьком опилочном сердечке шевельнулось столько любви, что оно чуть не лопнуло.stirred - [stɜːd] - размешано разболтано
heart - [hɑːt] - сердце
burst - [bɜːst] - лопаться взорваться
And into his boot-button eyes, that had long ago lost their polish, there came a look of wisdom and beauty, so that even Nana noticed it next morning when she picked him up, and said, "I declare if that old Bunny hasn't got quite a knowing expression!"И в его пуговичных глазах, которые давно потеряли свой блеск, появилось выражение мудрости и красоты, так что даже Нана заметила это на следующее утро, когда подняла его и сказала: "Я заявляю, что у этого старого Кролика не совсем понимающее выражение!"boot - [boot] - ботинок загружать
button - [button] - пуговица кнопка
polish - [ˈpɒlɪʃ] - блеск глянец
wisdom - [ˈwɪzdəm] - мудрость
picked - [pɪkt] - подобрала
declare - [dɪˈkleə] - объявлять заявлять
expression - [ɪksˈpreʃn] - выражение
That was a wonderful Summer!Это было чудесное лето!
Near the house where they lived there was a wood, and in the long June evenings the Boy liked to go there after tea to play.Рядом с домом, где они жили, рос лес, и долгими июньскими вечерами Мальчик любил ходить туда после чая поиграть.
He took the Velveteen Rabbit with him, and before he wandered off to pick flowers, or play at brigands among the trees, he always made the Rabbit a little nest somewhere among the bracken, where he would be quite cosy, for he was a kind-hearted little boy and he liked Bunny to be comfortable.Он брал с собой Вельветового Кролика и, прежде чем отправиться собирать цветы или играть в разбойников среди деревьев, всегда устраивал Кролику маленькое гнездышко где-нибудь в папоротнике, где ему было бы очень уютно, потому что он был добросердечным маленьким мальчиком и любил, чтобы Кролику было удобно.wandered off - [ˈwɒndəd ɒf] - бродил прочь
brigands - [ˈbrɪgəndz] - разбойники
among - [əˈmʌŋ] - среди между
nest - [nest] - гнездо гнездышко
somewhere - [ˈsʌmweə] - где-то
bracken - [ˈbrækən] - папоротник
cosy - [ˈkəʊzɪ] - уютный
One evening, while the Rabbit was lying there alone, watching the ants that ran to and fro between his velvet paws in the grass, he saw two strange beings creep out of the tall bracken near him.Однажды вечером, когда Кролик лежал там один, наблюдая за муравьями, которые бегали туда-сюда между его бархатными лапами в траве, он увидел, как два странных существа выползли из высокого папоротника рядом с ним.alone - [əˈləʊn] - один
ants - [ants] - муравьи
fro - [frəʊ] - обратно
beings - [ˈbiːɪŋz] - существа
creep - [kriːp] - ползать ползти
They were rabbits like himself, but quite furry and brand-new.Это были кролики, такие же, как он сам, но довольно пушистые и совершенно новые.furry - [ˈfɜːrɪ] - пушистый
brand-new - [brændˈnjuː] - совершенно новый
They must have been very well made, for their seams didn't show at all, and they changed shape in a queer way when they moved; one minute they were long and thin and the next minute fat and bunchy, instead of always staying the same like he did.Должно быть, они были очень хорошо сшиты, потому что их швы совсем не были видны, и они странным образом меняли форму, когда двигались; в одну минуту они были длинными и тонкими, а в следующую минуту толстыми и бугристыми, вместо того, чтобы всегда оставаться такими же, как он.shape - [ʃeɪp] - форма
queer - [kwɪə] - странный
instead - [ɪnˈsted] - вместо
same - [seɪm] - тот же самый
Their feet padded softly on the ground, and they crept quite close to him, twitching their noses, while the Rabbit stared hard to see which side the clockwork stuck out, for he knew that people who jump generally have something to wind them up.Их ноги мягко ступали по земле, и они подползли совсем близко к нему, подергивая носами, в то время как Кролик напряженно смотрел, с какой стороны торчит часовой механизм, потому что он знал, что у тех, которые прыгают, обычно есть что-то, что их заводит.feet - [fiːt] - ноги
padded - [ˈpædɪd] - ступали
crept - [krept] - подкрались
twitching - [ˈtwɪʧɪŋ] - подергивая
stared - [steəd] - глазели пялились
stuck - [stʌk] - прикрепленный
wind up - [wɪnd ʌp] - заводить
But he couldn't see it.Но он не мог этого видеть.
They were evidently a new kind of rabbit altogether.Очевидно, это был совершенно новый вид кроликов.evidently - [ˈevɪdəntlɪ] - очевидно
kind - [kaɪnd] - вид
altogether - [ɔːltəˈgeðə] - в целом в общем
They stared at him, and the little Rabbit stared back.Они уставились на него, и маленький Кролик уставился на них в ответ.
And all the time their noses twitched.И все это время их носы подергивались.
"Why don't you get up and play with us?"- Почему бы тебе не встать и не поиграть с нами?"get up - [get ʌp] - вставать
one of them asked. - спросил один из них.
"I don't feel like it," said the Rabbit, for he didn't want to explain that he had no clockwork.- Мне что-то не хочется, - сказал Кролик, не желая объяснять, что у него нет часового механизма.explain - [ɪksˈpleɪn] - объяснять
"Ho!"- Да ну!Ho! - [həʊ] - хо да ну
said the furry rabbit.- сказал пушистый кролик.
"It's as easy as anything."- Это так же просто, как и все остальное." (все понятно)
And he gave a big hop sideways and stood on his hind legs.И он сделал большой прыжок вбок и встал на задние лапы.hop - [hɒp] - прыжок
sideways - [ˈsaɪdweɪz] - в сторону
hind - [haɪnd] - задний
legs - [legz] - ноги лапы
"I don't believe you can!"- Я не верю, что ты можешь!"
he said.Он сказал
"I can!"Я могу
said the little Rabbit.Сказал маленький Кролик.
"I can jump higher than anything!""Я могу прыгать выше всего на свете!"
He meant when the Boy threw him, but of course he didn't want to say so.Он имел в виду, когда Мальчик бросал его, но, конечно, он не хотел этого говорить.
"Can you hop on your hind legs?"- Ты можешь прыгать на задних лапах?"
asked the furry rabbit.- спросил пушистый кролик.
That was a dreadful question, for the Velveteen Rabbit had no hind legs at all!Это был ужасный вопрос, потому что у Вельветового Кролика вообще не было задних ног!dreadful - [ˈdredf(ə)l] - ужасный
The back of him was made all in one piece, like a pincushion.Его зад был сделан целиком, как подушечка для булавок.pincushion - [ˈpɪnkʊʃn] - подушечка для булавок
He sat still in the bracken, and hoped that the other rabbits wouldn't notice.Он неподвижно сидел в папоротнике и надеялся, что другие кролики этого не заметят.still - [stɪl] - до сих пор все еще
"I don't want to!"- Я не хочу!"
he said again.- повторил он.
But the wild rabbits have very sharp eyes.Но у диких кроликов очень зоркие глаза.wild - [waɪld] - дикий
And this one stretched out his neck and looked.А этот вытянул шею и посмотрел.neck - [nek] - шея
"He hasn't got any hind legs!" - У него нет задних ног!"
he called out.- крикнул он.
"Fancy a rabbit without any hind legs!""Представьте себе кролика без задних ног!"
And he began to laugh.И он начал смеяться.laugh - [lɑːf] - смеяться
"I have!"- У меня есть!
cried the little Rabbit.- закричал маленький Кролик.cry - [kraɪ] - плакать
"I have got hind legs!- У меня есть задние ноги!
I am sitting on them!"Я сижу на них!
"Then stretch them out and show me, like this!"- Тогда растяни их и покажи мне, вот так!
said the wild rabbit.- сказал дикий кролик.
And he began to whirl round and dance, till the little Rabbit got quite dizzy.И он начал кружиться и танцевать, пока у маленького Кролика не закружилась голова.whirl - [wərl] - кружиться
till - [til] - пока
dizzy - [ˈdɪzɪ] - головокружение
"I don't like dancing," he said.- Я не люблю танцевать, - сказал он.
"I'd rather sit still!"- Я лучше посижу спокойно!rather - [ˈrɑːðə] - лучше
But all the while he was longing to dance, for a funny new tickly feeling ran through him, and he felt he would give anything in the world to be able to jump about like these rabbits did.Но все это время он страстно желал танцевать, потому что его охватило странное новое щекочущее чувство, и он чувствовал, что отдал бы все на свете, чтобы иметь возможность прыгать, как эти кролики.while - [waɪl] - промежуток времени
tickly - [ˈtɪklɪ] - щекотно
feeling - [ˈfiːlɪŋ] - чувство
The strange rabbit stopped dancing, and came quite close.Странный кролик перестал танцевать и подошел совсем близко.
He came so close this time that his long whiskers brushed the Velveteen Rabbit's ear, and then he wrinkled his nose suddenly and flattened his ears and jumped backwards.На этот раз он подошел так близко, что его длинные усы коснулись Вельветового Кроличьего уха, а затем он внезапно сморщил нос, прижал уши и отпрыгнул назад.brushed - [brʌʃt] - задел коснулся
wrinkled - [rɪŋkld] - сморщил
flattened - [flætnd] - расплющил выровнял
backwards - [ˈbækwədz] - назад
"He doesn’t smell right!"- От него плохо пахнет!
he exclaimed.- воскликнул он.exclaimed - [ikskleimd] - воскликнул
"He isn’t a rabbit at all!Он вовсе не кролик!
He isn’t real!"Он не настоящий!
"I am Real!"Я настоящий!
said the little Rabbit, "I am Real!сказал маленький кролик, "Я настоящий!
The Boy said so!"Мальчик так сказал.
And he nearly began to cry.И он чуть не заплакал.nearly - [ˈnɪəlɪ] - почти едва
Just then there was a sound of footsteps, and the Boy ran past near them, and with a stamp of feet and a flash of white tails the two strange rabbits disappeared.В этот момент послышались шаги, Мальчик пробежал мимо них, и, топнув ногами и мелькнув белыми хвостами, два странных кролика исчезли.past - [pɑːst] - прошлое пережитое
stamp - [stæmp] - топать топнуть
flash - [flæʃ] - мелькнуть сверкнуть
disappeared - [dɪsəˈpɪəd] - исчезли
"Come back and play with me!"- Вернитесь и поиграйте со мной!
called the little Rabbit.воскликнул маленький кролик
"Oh, do came back!Прошу, вернитесь!
I know I am Real!"Я настоящий!
But there was no answer, only the little ants ran to and fro, and the bracken swayed gently where the two strangers had passed.Но ответа не было, только маленькие муравьи бегали туда-сюда, и папоротник мягко покачивался там, где прошли два незнакомца.swayed - [sweid] - качался
gently - [ˈʤentlɪ] - нежно мягко
strangers - [ˈstreɪnʤəz] - незнакомцы чужестранцы
The Velveteen Rabbit was all alone.Вельветовый Кролик был совсем один.
"Oh, dear!"- О боже!
he thought.подумал он.
"Why did they run away like that?Почему они так убежали?
Why couldn't they stop and talk to me?"Почему они не могли остановиться и поговорить со мной?"
For a long time he lay very still, watching the bracken, and hoping that they would come back.Долгое время он лежал неподвижно, наблюдая за папоротником и надеясь, что они вернутся.
But they never returned, and presently the sun sank lower and the little white moths fluttered out, and the Boy came and carried him home.Но они так и не вернулись, и вскоре солнце опустилось ниже, и маленькие белые мотыльки вспорхнули, и Мальчик пришел и отнес его домой.presently - [ˈprezntlɪ] - вскоре
sank - [sænk] - затонуло погрузилось
moth - [mɒθ] - мотылек
flutter - [ˈflʌtə] - пархать
carried - [ˈkærɪd] - отнес
low - [ləʊ] - низко
Weeks passed, and the little Rabbit grew very old and shabby, but the Boy loved him just as much.Шли недели, и маленький Кролик стал очень старым и потрепанным, но Мальчик любил его так же сильно.
He loved him so hard that he loved all his whiskers off, and the pink lining to his ears turned grey, and his brown spots faded.Он любил его так сильно, что выдрал все его усы, и розовая подкладка у ушей стала серой, а коричневые пятна поблекли. (loved off дословно можно перевести, как вылюбил)faded - [ˈfeɪdɪd] - поблекли
He even began to lose his shape, and he scarcely looked like a rabbit any more, except to the Boy.Он даже начал терять форму и больше не походил на кролика, если не считать Мальчика.
To him he was always beautiful, and that was all that the little Rabbit cared about.Для него он всегда был прекрасен, и это было все, о чем заботился маленький Кролик.
He didn’t mind how he looked to other people, because the nursery magic had made him Real, and when you are Real shabbiness doesn't matter.Ему было все равно, как он выглядит для других людей, потому что детская магия сделала его Настоящим, а когда ты Настоящий, убогость не имеет значения.shabbiness - [ˈʃæbɪnəs] - убогость
And then, one day, the Boy was ill.И вот однажды Мальчик заболел.
His face grew very flushed, and he talked in his sleep, and his little body was so hot that it burned the Rabbit when he held him close.Его лицо сильно покраснело, и он говорил во сне, и его маленькое тельце было таким горячим, что обжигало Кролика, когда он прижимал его к себе.flushed - [flʌʃt] - раскрасневшийся
burn - [bɜːn] - жечь
held - [held] - держал удерживал
Strange people came and went in the nursery, and a light burned all night, and through it all the little Velveteen Rabbit lay there, hidden from sight under the bedclothes, and he never stirred, for he The Velveteen Rabbit loves the boy and waits patiently for himwas afraid that if they found him some one might take him away, and he knew that the Boy needed him.Странные люди приходили в детскую и уходили, и всю ночь горел свет, и все это время маленький Вельветовый Кролик лежал там, спрятанный от посторонних глаз под одеялом, и он ни разу не пошевелился, потому что он, Вельветовый Кролик, любит мальчика и терпеливо ждет его, боясь, что, если они найдут его, кто-нибудь может забрать его, и он знал, что Мальчик нуждается в нем.sight - [saɪt] - взгляд
stirred - [stɜːd] - шевелился
patiently - [ˈpeɪʃntlɪ] - терпеливо спокойно
It was a long weary time, for the Boy was too ill to play, and the little Rabbit found it rather dull with nothing to do all day long.Это было долгое утомительное время, потому что Мальчик был слишком болен, чтобы играть, и маленькому Кролику было довольно скучно, когда целый день нечего было делать.weary - [ˈwɪərɪ] - утомленный
dull - [dʌl] - скучный
But he snuggled down patiently, and looked forward to the time when the Boy should be well again, and they would go out in the garden amongst the flowers and the butterflies and play splendid games in the raspberry thicket like they used to.Но он терпеливо прижимался и предвкушал то время, когда Мальчик снова поправится, и они выйдут в сад среди цветов и бабочек и будут играть в великолепные игры в зарослях малины, как раньше.amongst - [əˈmʌŋst] - среди между
butterflies - [ˈbʌtəflaɪs] - бабочки
thicket - [ˈθɪkɪt] - заросли
All sorts of delightful things he planned, and while the Boy lay half asleep he crept up close to the pillow and whispered them in his ear.Он планировал всевозможные восхитительные вещи, и пока Мальчик лежал в полусне, он подкрался поближе к подушке и шептал их ему на ухо.delightful - [dɪˈlaɪtf(ə)l] - восхитительный
pillow - [ˈpɪləʊ] - подушка
And presently the fever turned, and the Boy got better.Вскоре лихорадка прошла, и Мальчику стало лучше.fever - [ˈfiːvə] - лихорадка
He was able to sit up in bed and look at picture books, while the little Rabbit cuddled close at his side.Он мог сидеть в постели и смотреть на книжки с картинками, в то время как маленький Кролик прижимался к нему.cuddled - [kʌdld] - обнимались прижимался
And one day, they let him get up and dress.И однажды они позволили ему встать и одеться.dress - [dres] - одежда одеваться
It was a bright, sunny morning, and the windows stood wide open.Было ясное, солнечное утро, и окна были распахнуты настежь.
They had carried the Boy out on to the balcony, wrapped in a shawl, and the little Rabbit lay tangled up among the bedclothes, thinking.Они вынесли Мальчика на балкон, завернутого в шаль, и маленький Кролик лежал, запутавшись в простынях, и думал.shawl - [ʃɔːl] - шаль
The Boy was going to the seaside to-morrow.Завтра Мальчик собирался на море.
Everything was arranged, and now it only remained to carry out the doctor's orders.Все было устроено, и теперь оставалось только выполнять распоряжения доктора.arranged - [əˈreɪnʤd] - организованный устроенный
They talked about it all, while the little Rabbit lay under the bedclothes, with just his head peeping out, and listened.Они говорили обо всем этом, пока маленький Кролик лежал под одеялом, высунув только голову, и слушал.peeping - [ˈpiːpɪŋ] - торчащий
The room was to be disinfected, and all the books and toys that the Boy had played with in bed must be burnt.Комнату нужно было продезинфицировать, а все книги и игрушки, с которыми Мальчик играл в постели, должны были быть сожжены.
"Hurrah!"Ура!Hurrah - [hʊˈrɑː] - ура
thought the little Rabbit.- подумал маленький Кролик.
"To-morrow we shall go to the seaside!"-Завтра мы поедем на море!
For the Boy had often talked of the seaside, and he wanted very much to see the big waves coming in, and the tiny crabs, and the sand castles.Мальчик часто говорил о морском побережье, и ему очень хотелось увидеть набегающие большие волны, крошечных крабов и замки из песка.tiny - [ˈtaɪnɪ] - крошечный
sand - [sænd] - песок
Just then Nana caught sight of him.В этот момент Нана заметила его.
"How about his old Bunny?"- А как насчет его старого Кролика?
she asked.она спросила.
"That?"Этого?
said the doctor.Сказал доктор.
"Why, it’s a mass of scarlet fever germs!Да это же масса микробов скарлатины!germs - [ʤɜːmz] - микробы
—Burn it at once.Сожгите его немедленно.
What?Что?
Nonsense!Ерунда!Nonsense - [ˈnɒnsəns] - ерунда вздор
Get him a new one.Дайте ему нового.
He mustn’t have that any more!"У него больше не должно быть этого!
And so the little Rabbit was put into a sack with the old picture-books and a lot of rubbish, and carried out to the end of the garden behind the fowl-house.И вот маленького Кролика положили в мешок со старыми книжками с картинками и кучей мусора и отнесли в конец сада за птичником.sack - [sæk] - мешок
rubbish - [ˈrʌbɪʃ] - мусор
fowl - [faʊl] - птица
That was a fine place to make a bonfire, only the gardener was too busy just then to attend to it.Это было прекрасное место, чтобы развести костер, только садовник был слишком занят, чтобы позаботиться об этом.bonfire - [ˈbɒnfaɪə] - костер
attend - [əˈtend] - обслуживать
He had the potatoes to dig and the green peas to gather, but next morning he promised to come quite early and burn the whole lot.Ему нужно было копать картошку и собирать зеленый горошек, но на следующее утро он пообещал прийти пораньше и сжечь все.dig - [dɪg] - копать
peas - [piːz] - горох
gather - [ˈgæðə] - собирать
whole - [həʊl] - весь
That night the Boy slept in a different bedroom, and he had a new bunny to sleep with him.В ту ночь Мальчик спал в другой спальне, и у него был новый кролик, чтобы спать с ним.
It was a splendid bunny, all white plush with real glass eyes, but the Boy was too excited to care very much about it.Это был великолепный кролик, весь из белого плюша, с настоящими стеклянными глазами, но Мальчик был слишком взволнован, чтобы обращать на него внимание.plush - [plʌʃ] - плюш плюшевый
excited - [ɪkˈsaɪtɪd] - волновался
For to-morrow he was going to the seaside, and that in itself was such a wonderful thing that he could think of nothing else.Потому что завтра он собирался на море, и это само по себе было так чудесно, что он не мог думать ни о чем другом.
And while the Boy was asleep, dreaming of the seaside, the little Rabbit lay among the old picture-books in the corner behind the fowlhouse, and he felt very lonely.И пока Мальчик спал, мечтая о море, маленький Кролик лежал среди старых книжек с картинками в углу за птичником, и ему было очень одиноко.lonely - [ˈləʊnlɪ] - одинокий
The sack had been left untied, and so by wriggling a bit he was able to get his head through the opening and look out.Мешок был оставлен развязанным, и, немного пошевелившись, он смог просунуть голову в отверстие и выглянуть наружу.untied - [ˈʌnˈtaɪd] - развязали развязанный
wriggling - [ˈrɪglɪŋ] - извиваясь
He was shivering a little, for he had always been used to sleeping in a proper bed, and by this time his coat had worn so thin and threadbare from hugging that it was no longer any protection to him.Он слегка дрожал, потому что всегда привык спать в нормальной постели, и к этому времени его пальто стало таким тонким и изношенным от объятий, что оно больше не служило ему защитой.shivering - [ˈʃɪvərɪŋ] - дрожащий
proper - [ˈprɒpə] - правильный верный
worn - [wɔːn] - изношенный поношенный
threadbare - [ˈθredbeə] - потертый изношенный
Near by he could see the thicket of raspberry canes, growing tall and close like a tropical jungle, in whose shadow he had played with the Boy on bygone mornings.Рядом виднелись заросли малинового тростника, высокие и тесные, как тропические джунгли, в тени которых он играл с Мальчиком в прошлые утра.bygone - [ˈbaɪgɒn] - прошлое
He thought of those long sunlit hours in the garden—how happy they were—and a great sadness came over him.Он подумал о тех долгих солнечных часах в саду, о том, как они были счастливы, и его охватила глубокая печаль.sunlit - [ˈsʌnlɪt] - залитый солнцем
sadness - [ˈsædnɪs] - печаль
He seemed to see them all pass before him, each more beautiful than the other, the fairy huts in the flower-bed, the quiet evenings in the wood when he lay in the bracken and the little ants ran over his paws; the wonderful day when he first knew that he was Real.Ему казалось, что все они проходят перед ним, каждый прекраснее другого, сказочные хижины на клумбе, тихие вечера в лесу, когда он лежал в папоротнике и маленькие муравьи бегали по его лапам; чудесный день, когда он впервые понял, что он Настоящий.seemed - [siːmd] - казалось
quiet - [ˈkwaɪət] - тихий
He thought of the Skin Horse, so wise and gentle, and all that he had told him.Он подумал о Кожаном Коне, таком мудром и нежном, и обо всем, что тот ему рассказал.
Of what use was it to be loved and lose one’s beauty and become Real if it all ended like this?Что толку быть любимым, терять свою красоту и становиться Настоящим, если все так закончилось?
And a tear, a real tear, trickled down his little shabby velvet nose and fell to the ground.И слеза, настоящая слеза, скатилась по его маленькому потертому бархатному носику и упала на землю.tear - [teə] - слеза
trickled - [trɪkld] - сочилась
fell - [fel] - упал
And then a strange thing happened.И тут произошла странная вещь.
For where the tear had fallen a flower grew out of the ground, a mysterious flower, not at all like any that grew in the garden.Ибо там, куда упала слеза, из земли вырос цветок, таинственный цветок, совсем не похожий на те, что росли в саду.mysterious - [mɪsˈtɪərɪəs] - таинственный
It had slender green leaves the colour of emeralds, and in the centre of the leaves a blossom like a golden cup.У него были тонкие зеленые листья цвета изумрудов, а в центре листьев цветок, похожий на золотую чашу.slender - [ˈslendə] - стройный тонкий
leaves - [liːvz] - листья
colour - [ˈkʌlə] - цвет
emeralds - [ˈemərəlds] - изумруды
blossom - [ˈblɒsəm] - цветок соцветие
It was so beautiful that the little Rabbit forgot to cry, and just lay there watching it.Это было так красиво, что маленький Кролик забыл плакать и просто лежал и смотрел на это.
And presently the blossom opened, and out of it there stepped a fairy.И вот цветок раскрылся, и из него вышла фея.stepped - [stept] - ступал шагал
She was quite the loveliest fairy in the whole world.Она была самой прекрасной феей на свете.
Her dress was of pearl and dewdrops, and there were flowers round her neck and in her hair, and her face was like the most perfect flower of all.Ее платье было из жемчуга и капель росы, а на шее и в волосах были цветы, и ее лицо было похоже на самый совершенный цветок из всех.pearl - [pɜːl] - жемчужина
dewdrops - [djuːˈdrɒps] - капли росы
perfect - [ˈpɜːfɪkt] - идеальный
And she came close to the little Rabbit and gathered him up in her arms and kissed him on his velveteen nose that was all damp from crying.И она подошла к маленькому Кролику, взяла его на руки и поцеловала в его бархатный нос, который был весь мокрый от слез.
"Little Rabbit," she said, "don't you know who I am?"- Кролик, - сказала она, - разве ты не знаешь, кто я?
The Rabbit looked up at her, and it seemed to him that he had seen her face before, but he couldn't think where.Кролик посмотрел на нее, и ему показалось, что он видел ее лицо раньше, но он не мог вспомнить, где.
"I am the nursery magic Fairy," she said.- Я Фея детской магии,- сказала она.
"I take care of all the playthings that the children have loved.Я забочусь обо всех игрушках, которых любят дети.
When they are old and worn out and the children don't need them any more, then I come and take them away with me and turn them into Real."Когда они стары и изношены, и детям они больше не нужны, тогда я приaхожу, забираю их с собой и превращаю в Настоящих.
"Wasn't I Real before?""Разве я не был Настоящим раньше?"
asked the little Rabbit.- спросил маленький Кролик.
"You were Real to the Boy," the Fairy said, "because he loved you.-Ты была Настоящей для Мальчика, - сказала Фея, - потому что он любил тебя.
Now you shall be real to every one."Теперь ты будешь настоящим для всех.
And she held the little Rabbit close in her arms and flew with him into the wood.И она крепко обняла маленького Кролика и полетела с ним в лес.flew - [fluː] - летал
It was light now, for the moon had risen.Было уже светло, потому что взошла луна.risen - [ˈrɪz(ə)n]] - поднявшийся вознесшийся
All the forest was beautiful, and the fronds of the bracken shone like frosted silver.Весь лес был прекрасен, и листья папоротника сияли, как матовое серебро.fronds - [frɒndz] - листья
frosted - [ˈfrɒstɪd] - матовый
In the open glade between the tree-trunks the wild rabbits danced with their shadows on the velvet grass, but when they saw the Fairy they all stopped dancing and stood round in a ring to stare at her.На открытой поляне между стволами деревьев дикие кролики танцевали со своими тенями на бархатной траве, но когда они увидели Фею, все они прекратили танцевать и встали в кольцо, чтобы посмотреть на нее.trunks - [trʌŋks] - стволы
stare - [steə] - глазеть
"I’ve brought you a new playfellow," the Fairy said.- Я принесла вам нового товарища по играм, - сказала Фея.playfellow - [ˈpleɪfeləʊ] - товарищ по играм
"You must be very kind to him and teach him all he needs to know in Rabbitland, for he is going to live with you for ever and ever!"- Вы должны быть очень добры к нему и научить его всему, что ему нужно знать в Кроличьей Стране, потому что он будет жить с вами вечно!"
And she kissed the little Rabbit again and put him down on the grass.И она снова поцеловала маленького Кролика и положила его на траву.
"Run and play, little Rabbit!"- Бегай и играй, маленький Кролик!
she said.Сказала она.
But the little Rabbit sat quite still for a moment and never moved.Но маленький Кролик с минуту сидел совершенно неподвижно и не двигался.
For when he saw all the wild rabbits dancing around him he suddenly remembered about his hind legs, and he didn’t want them to see that he was made all in one piece.Потому что, когда он увидел всех диких кроликов, танцующих вокруг него, он вдруг вспомнил о своих задних лапах, и он не хотел, чтобы они видели, что он сделан целиком и полностью.
He did not know that when the Fairy kissed him that last time she had changed him altogether.Он не знал, что, когда Фея поцеловала его в последний раз, она полностью изменила его.
And he might have sat there a long time, too shy to move, if just then something hadn't tickled his nose, and before he thought what he was doing he lifted his hind toe to scratch it.И он, возможно, просидел бы так долго, стыдясь пошевелиться, если бы в этот момент что-то не защекотало ему нос, и, прежде чем он сообразил, что делает он делает, он поднял заднюю ногу, чтобы почесать его.lifted - [ˈlɪftɪd] - поднял
toe - [təʊ] - палец ноги нога
scratch - [skræʧ] - царапина чесать
And he found that he actually had hind legs!И он обнаружил, что у него действительно есть задние ноги!
Instead of dingy velveteen he had brown fur, soft and shiny, his ears twitched by themselves, and his whiskers were so long that they brushed the grass.Вместо выцветшего вельвета у него был коричневый мех, мягкий и блестящий, уши подергивались сами по себе, а усы были такими длинными, что касались травы.dingy - [ˈdɪnʤɪ] - выцветший
He gave one leap and the joy of using those hind legs was so great that he went springing about the turf on them, jumping sideways and whirling round as the others did, and he grew so excited that when at last he did stop to look for the Fairy she had gone.Он сделал один прыжок, и радость от использования этих задних ног была так велика, что он прыгал на них по дерну, прыгал вбок и кружился, как и другие, и он так разволновался, что, когда наконец остановился, чтобы посмотреть на Фею, она исчезла.leap - [liːp] - прыжок прагать
springing - [ˈsprɪŋɪŋ] - пружинящий прагающий
turf - [tɜːf] - дерн
whirling - [ˈwɜːlɪŋ] - кружащийся
He was a Real Rabbit at last, at home with the other rabbits.Наконец-то он стал Настоящим Кроликом, дома, с другими кроликами.
Autumn passed and Winter, and in the Spring, when the days grew warm and sunny, the Boy went out to play in the wood behind the house.Прошла осень и зима, а весной, когда дни становились теплыми и солнечными, Мальчик вышелд поиграть в лес за домом.
And while he was playing, two rabbits crept out from the bracken and peeped at him.И пока он играл, из папоротника выползли два кролика и посмотрели на него.peep - [piːp] - подсмотреть
One of them was brown all over, but the other had strange markings under his fur, as though long ago he had been spotted, and the spots still showed through.Один из них был весь коричневый, но у другого под шерстью были странные отметины, поскольку хотя давным-давно он был пятнистым, пятна все еще проступали.though - [ðəʊ] - хотя впрочем
"Why, he looks just like my old Bunny that was lost when I had scarlet fever!"- Да ведь он похож на моего старого Кролика, который пропал, когда у меня была скарлатина!
But he never knew that it really was his own Bunny, come back to look at the child who had first helped him to be Real.Но он так и не узнал, что это действительно был его собственный Кролик, вернувшийся, чтобы посмотреть на ребенка, который впервые помог ему стать Настоящим.

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